|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Cashman challenges A-Rod over leg flap

  • NEW YORK — Brian Cashman's expression said it all.
    • email print
  • NEW YORK — Brian Cashman's expression said it all.
    Every time Alex Rodriguez's name was mentioned Friday, the New York Yankees general manager appeared as if he might get sick.
    The subject was the third baseman's claim that his left quadriceps really isn't injured, but it could have been any one several topics: Rodriguez's alleged performance-enhancing drug use, his pesky Twitter and radio appearances or his knack for creating tabloid headlines.
    Cashman challenged A-Rod to have his leg examined by an outside doctor or perhaps even file a grievance, defending the team's medical and training staff and saying he wouldn't comment on "extra noise."
    The third baseman detailed his frustration during a radio interview Thursday, just hours after team management said he wouldn't be ready to resume minor league rehab games until Aug. 1. Rodriguez wouldn't answer when asked whether he trusted the Yankees.
    "The MRI is the MRI. It's fact. You can't change the results on an MRI," Cashman said before Friday's 10-6 loss to Tampa Bay in a homestand opener. "So, we're very comfortable with it, and if anybody wants to utilize the process in place with the union, go right ahead. It's not something we're afraid of."
    Recovering from January hip surgery, Rodriguez is under investigation by Major League Baseball for his reported ties to a Florida clinic accused of distributing banned performance-enhancing drugs. A lengthy suspension appears likely.
    Seemingly days away from rejoining the Yankees, he complained of leg pain last weekend, and the Yankees said an MRI on Sunday showed a quadriceps strain. An outside physician, Michael Gross, said Wednesday he looked at an MRI at Rodriguez's request — it's not clear when the MRI was taken — and could not detect an injury. Gross is not on baseball's list of doctors recommended for second opinions, and he admitted he never personally examined Rodriguez.
    The Yankees responded angrily because Rodriguez didn't follow the procedure in baseball's labor contract, which requires him to provide written notice when a player wants a second medical opinion, and the team intends to discipline him — most likely with a fine.
    Rodriguez did conditioning work Friday at the team's minor league complex in Tampa, Fla., a day ahead of his 38th birthday, and Cashman said the three-time MVP is on a schedule that could have him resume minor league games Aug. 1.
Reader Reaction
      • calendar