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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • The state of Oregon currently houses Gary Haugen on death row. This man has petitioned Gov. John Kitzhaber to have his sentence carried out. Kitzhaber, citing his past profession as a medical doctor, has blocked this procedure.
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  • The state of Oregon currently houses Gary Haugen on death row. This man has petitioned Gov. John Kitzhaber to have his sentence carried out. Kitzhaber, citing his past profession as a medical doctor, has blocked this procedure.
    Those who do not believe in the death penalty must remember that Oregon's voting public passed the bill for the death penalty, more than once, to ensure that the penalty be carried out whenever the sentence on a criminal is handed down. Once again, the high court has to step in to hear oral arguments on whether the twice-convicted murderer can waive an unconditional reprieve issued by Kitzhaber in 2011.
    The governor was trained to be a medical professional, not a wannabe politician. The state of Texas has carried out approximately 500 executions, so what is the problem with the state of Oregon to not give the convicted felon what he wishes? Oregon's law is based on the Texas law. This was proven in 1988 by the U.S. Supreme court ruling in Penry vs. Lynaugh. Just because he thinks the death penalty is wrong doesn't make it right.
    Why is there an ongoing delay in this case? — Jim Runels, Medford
    As a mother, a longtime resident of Southern Oregon and a nature lover, I care deeply not only for the people of the region but for the forests, rivers and streams as well.
    Many of our most beautiful spots are on public lands overseen by the Bureau of Land Management. These lands safeguard our clean water, provide homes for wildlife and include some of the last remaining old-growth forests in the United States.
    As chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Sen. Ron Wyden has created a framework that he says will create jobs, provide revenue to counties, protect old-growth and wilderness. This sounds great. We need jobs that help preserve those special places close to home where people go to fish, hunt, hike and camp with their families.
    Wyden has an opportunity to create a legacy for Oregonians. I look forward to his assuring the protection of our natural resources; those unique mature forests and watersheds that are the home of our clean drinking water, abundant fish and animals and precious scenic beauty. — Selene Aitken, Ashland
    Federal wildlife officials plan to dispatch hunters into forests of the Pacific Northwest starting this fall to shoot one species of owl to protect another.
    Boy, that sure sounds like a great idea. I wish they would have thought of that about 20 years ago and shot the spotted owl. Everyone would be much better off today.
    When you place the importance of a spotted owl or any animal ahead of a human being, something is very wrong. Yes, I'm talking about the wood-products industry that was hurt so badly by the environmentalists because of their misbelief on the spotted owl. Many families, small communities and the state of Oregon were devastated by the environmentalist way of thinking. The spotted owl was just a tool the environmentalists used to stop the cutting of trees. That was their main focus. No trees cut.
    I myself want to protect the Earth as much as I can, but I will not place the importance of a bird before a human being. — Terry Smith, Central Point
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