|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Last weekend we camped at the Upper Rogue River. About sunset our peace was interrupted by loud, amplified music from a campsite we could not easily identify. Amplified music echoes across water and carries into distant sites. Camp hosts do not always patrol consistently after dark.
    • email print
  • Last weekend we camped at the Upper Rogue River. About sunset our peace was interrupted by loud, amplified music from a campsite we could not easily identify. Amplified music echoes across water and carries into distant sites. Camp hosts do not always patrol consistently after dark.
    Most people go camping to escape the noise pollution of the city, to hear bird songs and the rushing river, not someone else's bass-intensive, amplified music. Low-volume, acoustic guitar playing or singing around a campfire has always been a pleasant part of the camping tradition. When did it morph into intrusive, booming, electronic music played late into the night? Our camp-out ended on a sour note. — Maryellen Wilson, Ashland
    Robert Galvin's article "Behind the smoke ... the mirrors" is very well-written, almost a poetic narrative in a novel. Part of his message is that our heroes demonstrate risk to protect us and that once the emergency is under control, our response to our "heroes" is inconsistent with their effort (or risk).
    "Heroes" obviously come in different shapes, sizes and in different vocations. Mr. Galvin rightly questions are we not responsible or willing to expend effort to "protect" them, or to expend effort to face and take action to deal with other societal problems?
    These problems in our society are multi-leveled. It has become so overwhelming that many of us are feeling powerless and becoming (or have become) apathetic. How do we change from looking the other way to becoming responsible? How do we start? — Katharine Sloan, Medford
    An Aug. 1 New York Times editorial written by four former Republican-appointed directors of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency warns us about the economic and life-style changes coming from climate change.
    Their plea for action is dramatic, to the point, and nonpartisan! For example they say, "the window of time remaining to act is growing smaller: delay could mean that warming becomes 'locked in.' If we could articulate one framework for successful governance, perhaps it should be this: When confronted by a problem, deal with it. Look at the facts, cut through the extraneous, devise a workable solution and get it done."
    Powerful words with warnings that we all need to work together, take action, and act now! I say why can't we learn from the largely successful acid rain cap and trade program initiated in the U.S. some 23 years ago? A program supported by the first President Bush. Now, make it applicable to a carbon emission program.
    Want to learn more about what you can do about climate change? Visit www.socan.info, your Rogue Valley source on all things climate change. Better yet, come to a monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday at the Medford library. — Dr. Ray Seidler, Ashland
    Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation recently donated $10,000 to Medford's St. Vincent de Paul Society to be used to help families facing disconnection of their utilities. Many families in the Rogue Valley are facing economic crises because of the recent recession and jobless recovery. This generous donation will be of great assistance. — Phyllis Douglas, Talent
Reader Reaction

      calendar