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MailTribune.com
  • August 16, 1913

  • T.A. Belford, state highway commissioner for the northern division of California, and N.E. Graves, chairman of the Siskiyou County highway board, arrived in Medford Saturday to confer with the county court on the new road over the Siskiyous.
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  • T.A. Belford, state highway commissioner for the northern division of California, and N.E. Graves, chairman of the Siskiyou County highway board, arrived in Medford Saturday to confer with the county court on the new road over the Siskiyous.
    They inspected the work now under way and found that both the Jackson County and California road parties will reach the line about the same time and that the work is progressing rapidly.
    Messrs. Belford and Graves will auto to Eureka to attend the tri-state good roads meeting to be held there August 20-21.
    u
    "Quo Vadis?" (Whither goest thou?). An opportunity will be afforded the public of this city to witness the stupendous moving picture production of this stirring tale of the divine tragedy of the Christian martyrs.
    A perfect presentation of this correct version of "Quo Vadis," in all its terrifying vividness, faithfully portrayed with all historical accuracy, thrilling and startling tableaux, and the revels and rampant debaucheries of Nero's court will be shown at the Page Theater Thursday and Friday, August 21-22.
    In conjunction with the above will be shown the intensely interesting and instructive producuction of "Wildest America," which has been pronounced by those competent to judge as the most marvelous portrayal of magnificent mountain scenery, gorgeous waterfalls, giant geysers and all phases of wild animal life ever attempted in motion pictures.
    Owing to the fact that it requires two-hours-and-a-half to run these films, there will only be one show each evening. Curtain is at 8:45 p.m.
    u
    State Game Warden Finley arrived yesterday afternoon with the state fish car and 180,000 rainbow trout fry, destined for Big Butte, but on account of the refusal of the Pacific & Eastern to haul the car out that evening the trout never reached their destination. It was impossible to hold the fry over another night, so auto volunteers were called and a collection taken up and auto trucks hired and the bulk of the fry hauled out to the Little Applegate and Little Butte above Brownsboro. The balance, through the courtesy of the Southern Pacific, were taken back to Gold Hill, where H.D. Reed and other Gold Hill citizens placed them in the Rogue.
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