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MailTribune.com
  • August 20, 1913

  • Matches in a suit being cleaned at the Pantatorium Dye Works plant on North Grape Street caused a fire this morning that resulted in the destruction of $900 worth of clothes. The matches were ignited when being run through a "tumbler" causing an explosion of gasoline. The interior of the building was gutted and the machinery,...
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  • Matches in a suit being cleaned at the Pantatorium Dye Works plant on North Grape Street caused a fire this morning that resulted in the destruction of $900 worth of clothes. The matches were ignited when being run through a "tumbler" causing an explosion of gasoline. The interior of the building was gutted and the machinery, on which insurance was carried, damaged. No insurance was carried on the clothes, but all claims will be paid, the company announces. The fire department extinguished the blaze after a quick run.
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    "DENVER, Colo., Aug. 20. — It will be possible in ten years to eliminate tuberculosis of the lungs."
    This statement, made by Dr. Jefferson D. Gibson, pulmonary tuberculosis specialist of Denver, and originator of a plan by which the dreaded disease, which kills more persons than any other malady, can be stayed, has resulted in appeals from thousands all over the country for more details of his proposed treatment. Dr. Gibson's statement was made before the convention of Homeopathic physicians here recently. Many physicians have commended and approved Dr. Gibson's treatment, but there have been others to criticize it adversely.
    Dr. Gibson proposes to eliminate tuberculosis of the lungs by an X-ray treatment augmented by injection of a serum, sunlight and fresh air. His somewhat technical explanation of the treatment before the physicians convention has not been fully understood by laymen and to answer his critics he today gave a practical explanation through the United Press.
    "The first part of infection in a vast majority of cases of lung tuberculosis," said Dr. Gibson, "originates in the bronchial glands and radiates from there to the top of the lungs. It then spreads fan-like over the remainder of the lung tissues.
    "Splendid results have been obtained by treating the glands of the neck, abdomen and other parts with the X-ray. The X-ray will produce equally good results if applied to the bronchial glands. It thus cuts short, or prevents pulmonary tuberculosis entirely."
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