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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Regarding the letter by Dave Hale on Aug. 28, where he is praising Russia and saying it's following God more than this country because it oppresses gays: I go to a Christian church that believes that God loves us all, whatever our race, sex or sexual orientation; that we are all of value; and that we all have rights.
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  • Regarding the letter by Dave Hale on Aug. 28, where he is praising Russia and saying it's following God more than this country because it oppresses gays: I go to a Christian church that believes that God loves us all, whatever our race, sex or sexual orientation; that we are all of value; and that we all have rights.
    The loving God that I believe in does not condone oppression of any group. — Roan Wildmare, Medford
    After reading your editorial "Leave the light on," I obviously agree with it in almost every aspect except for one.
    You state that I should have approached the council to express my concern rather than filing a complaint. In a perfect world this would work. However, in the real world of Phoenix, the city attorney would have dismissed my complaint. As proof I offer the following quote by the city attorney taken from the minutes of the July 15 City Council meeting:
    "Attorney Knudsen responded the discussion of management salary during an executive session has come into question. He added he did not find any information that could support the complaint, as there is only the attorney general's opinion that states the discussion may be inappropriate during an executive session. He further added that this does not hold a lot of weight, considering it does not have the support of a statute that addresses this issue."
    If the city attorney does not believe that an AG opinion has any weight, then my only option was to file with the Oregon Government Ethics Commission. — Steven A. Schulman, Phoenix
    Why is Obama so eager to believe the al-Qaida rebels in Syria?
    The U.S. has been proclaiming for months that we would attack Syria if they used chemical weapons against civilians, so obviously Syrian president Assad is not going to invite the U.S. to attack by doing that. Especially since he's winning the war against the al-Qaida rebels, and because gassing his own people wouldn't help him. Remember the news during this past year that al-Qaida has tried to claim this same lie about Assad a few times already and it always came out that al-Qaida did it.
    John Kerry is now saying there's undeniable proof that it was the Syrian government that gassed citizens, but he's not showing that proof. Doesn't this sound familiar? Isn't that how we got into Iraq "by mistake?" In fact, Kerry is even saying he's not going to wait to see what the U.N. inspectors discover about who is responsible for the attack. So how can he have proof? Syria is allied with Russia and Iran, so an attack on Syria could quickly escalate. Please stop the mad rush to war by calling and writing to the White House and your representatives. ­— Eli Dumitru, Medford
    The use of deadly chemical weapons in Syria is extremely disturbing, but serious questions remain as to exactly who was responsible and why. We must be cautious about committing our nation's resources to another "regime change" in the Middle East until we know the rational end game.
    Syria is not a clear case of the "good guys" and the "bad guys". It's more like "the bad guys" and "the badder guys" — and who's the worst changes from day to day. As tragic as the situation is, it is far from clear that U.S./NATO military intervention will bring about a stable, long-term solution. A more rational approach would be to — as much as possible — starve the entire region of weaponry rather than introducing even more. If you agree, it's vital to immediately communicate this to President Obama and our congressional representatives. — Bruce Borgerson, Ashland
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