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MailTribune.com
  • Federal marijuana policy memo spurs questions

    But Washington state will vote on final rules this week
  • SEATTLE — For some laboring in Washington state's fledgling marijuana industry, last week's announcement by the U.S. Justice Department was a policy shift more nuanced than bold, more a flashing caution signal than a green light.
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  • SEATTLE — For some laboring in Washington state's fledgling marijuana industry, last week's announcement by the U.S. Justice Department was a policy shift more nuanced than bold, more a flashing caution signal than a green light.
    The department's long-awaited statement on legalized marijuana in Washington and Colorado offered neither outright support nor opposition. Instead the four-page memo to federal prosecutors set boundaries on what the feds would tolerate from the two states creating recreational markets for adults. At the same time, the memo made it clear that all marijuana remains illegal under federal law.
    While the new federal direction eventually might lead to profound changes in marijuana policy across the country, things on the ground in Washington state haven't changed dramatically — yet.
    Final rules will be proposed Wednesday by state officials for a system that will allow adults to buy an ounce of marijuana in regulated stores. Those rules already contain many of the safeguards the federal government is seeking: Don't sell or market to minors, don't evade taxes, don't divert marijuana to other states.
    But obstacles remain.
    Nothing in the federal memo compels resistant Washington cities to allow marijuana merchants within their borders. And the reluctance of federally insured banks to touch legal marijuana money still is a major impediment, leaving a multibillion-dollar industry to deal only in cash. "That's absurd," said Mark Kleiman, the state's top marijuana consultant.
    No doubt, the feds did suggest some sweeping changes in Thursday's policy guidelines, including opening the door to legalization in other states. The biggest, according to Jonathan Caulkins, a state marijuana policy consultant, is that the federal government signaled that large, for-profit operations are welcome, as long as they adhere to the Justice Department's policy guidelines.
    That will tend to shift the industry from more craft-oriented to industrial production, said Caulkins, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University. In turn, he said, that might move the industry toward mass marketing.
    "If I'm a medical-marijuana stakeholder I am very worried about how the feds are going to treat my industry," said attorney Hilary Bricken, whose firm specializes in advising marijuana entrepreneurs. "Very clearly now they have a tolerance point that they haven't had before and it does not include the Wild West, which is what most medical regimes are."
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