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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • According to the editorial board, when Oregon politicians write legislation behind closed doors that calls for clearcutting a million and a half acres of public lands it's because they are searching for reasonable solutions. But when environmentalists brand that proposal as "Oregon, home of the clearcut" it is because they aren't interested in compromise. I'd call it truth in advertising. — Jordan Beckett, Ashland
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  • According to the editorial board, when Oregon politicians write legislation behind closed doors that calls for clearcutting a million and a half acres of public lands it's because they are searching for reasonable solutions. But when environmentalists brand that proposal as "Oregon, home of the clearcut" it is because they aren't interested in compromise. I'd call it truth in advertising. — Jordan Beckett, Ashland
    It has been a great summer painting en plein air around the Rogue Valley. The interaction with locals and tourists and the spectacular scenery has been stellar. My experiences reinforced that life here is just about perfect.
    There are only a few months left of warmer weather. My goal is to continue painting on location throughout the winter but realistically I will retreat indoors. And I'll need other activities besides painting as others do during winter.
    That brings me to the point. Without libraries, historical societies, the OSU Extension and with possible cutbacks in public safety, what kind of life can valley residents expect?
    A recent editorial explored the disadvantage of numerous taxing districts being proposed. How many districts will voters approve? What would be the total cost of all districts? It is time to rethink commissioner Skundrick's proposal of up to $10 monthly to pay for the jail and free up monies for the rest.
    No one wants to pay more fees but we owe it to kids, adults, agriculturists and all citizens to provide a rounded life. It is time for the commissioners to step up to the plate and do what it takes to provide those services. — Margaret Bradburn, Eagle Point
    In thinking about the indecisiveness of our president, historians may well remember the words of Winston Churchill, a great statesman of the past, who said: "An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last."
    Looking for a solution to the Syrian situation, the words of another original thinker, Albert Einstein, come to mind: "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."
    In my humble opinion Obama is exhibiting a combination of both traits spoken of by Churchill and Einstein.
    When will we ever learn? — David l. Israel, Medford
    Once we went into the Middle East we lost any semblance of peace in the foreseeable future.
    Like Vietnam, there is no way to win this war. Even if we could win fighting a guerrilla warfare against home advantage — and you can't — we would still lose — having incurred the "While there is breath in my body I will never stop" type of blood hate from mourning loved ones. And the numbers get bigger with each new day and each new country.
    The best we can do at this point is go home. We cannot undo the harm we have caused by our presence there, and we can't fix it. There will be no glory, no job well done, and when we leave we will leave behind chaos — again. — Lin Scarrow, Gold Hill
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