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MailTribune.com
  • All About Goats

    Dogs and cats are nice, but what about adopting your own goat? They pull weeds!
  • Looking for a roving lawn mower that also can plow through blackberry bushes while providing a healthy dose of stress-relieving companionship? Sanctuary One has got your goat.
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    • Learn more about goats
      What: Get Yer Goat Day, annual goat education day, featuring beginner and advanced classes on everything goat-related, including breeding, milking, vet care, parasites, nutrition and more.
      Who:...
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      Learn more about goats
      What: Get Yer Goat Day, annual goat education day, featuring beginner and advanced classes on everything goat-related, including breeding, milking, vet care, parasites, nutrition and more.

      Who: Oregon State University Extension

      When: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 14

      Where: Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center auditorium, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

      Cost: Adults, $35; youth, $20; Cheesemaking, a separate workshop limited to 20, $50

      Registration: Online registration at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/farms

      Details: Call 541-776-7371
  • Looking for a roving lawn mower that also can plow through blackberry bushes while providing a healthy dose of stress-relieving companionship? Sanctuary One has got your goat.
    "We have 20 goats that are up for adoption," said Sansa Collins, animal care manager at the Applegate care farm.
    We kid you not. And the goats are available at a discounted adoption rate, Collins said.
    "They are $50 for the first goat, and $25 for each additional goat," she said.
    The goats come "in all different colors and all different breeds," ranging from multicolored Angoras to rangy alpines, Collins said.
    "Our tiny little Nigerian dwarf is called Scooby Keith," she said, adding the goat came to the sanctuary's Double Oak Farm with the moniker, which amused the staff so much they decided he should keep it.
    Jude is one of five available Angora goats sporting glamorous, high-quality mohair, she said.
    "They all have fantastic wool," she said.
    Alpine goats Orville and Wilbur are buddied up, as are two does, Daffodil and Daisy.
    No rams are available. All adoptees are either does or wethers. Collins hopes some folks will be able to provide homes for multiple goats that have formed strong bonds.
    "Three of the goats have been here since 2010," Collins said. "There is a mother and daughter pair. We don't want to break up bonded pairs."
    Tall or short, hairy or close-cropped, all of the goats are fun to watch and are "pretty good at pulling weeds," Collins said.
    Depending on their previous interactions with humans, some goats are more comfortable providing up-close companionship than others, she said.
    "They each have unique personalities," Collins said. "Some are super-duper friendly and want to hang out with you, and we have some who are really shy and want to hang in the background and eat blackberry leaves."
    But a goat cannot live on lawn trimmings and blackberry bushes alone, Collins warned. Every prospective adopter will need be able to provide hay, hoof trimming and regular deworming medicine for their goats.
    "All of our normal screening processes apply," she said.
    Sanctuary One also would welcome donations of hay for its animals, Collins added.
    "We are looking for hay donations and homes before the winter hits," Collins said.
    In addition, the care farm is on the hunt for few good interns who would like to experience life on a farm. Sanctuary One helps people of all ages experience nature's power to heal by providing them with an opportunity to volunteer at the nonprofit farm, she said.
    "We are accepting applications for fall and winter," Collins said. "The interns live on the farm. We like to have them sign up for one to three months at a time. Three months is ideal, but we're open right now."
    Care farms are places where people, animals and the earth work together for mutual healing, she said. Working with animals and gardening has been shown to lower blood pressure, ease depression and stress and help lonely people establish therapeutic relationships, Collins said.
    For information about adopting a goat, donating hay or volunteering, see www.SantuaryOne.org or call 541-899-8627.
    Reach reporter Sanne Specht at 541-776-4497 or sspecht@mailtribune.com.
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