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MailTribune.com
  • September 14, 1913

  • Upon the method employed by the Northwestern Fruit Exchange in the handling of perishable fruits in long-distance shipments the United States government has stamped its unqualified approval. The car of Rogue River Bartlett pears "trailed" by an agent of the department of agriculture, to which reference has heretofore been made, went through to its destination in exceptionally good shape.
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  • Upon the method employed by the Northwestern Fruit Exchange in the handling of perishable fruits in long-distance shipments the United States government has stamped its unqualified approval. The car of Rogue River Bartlett pears "trailed" by an agent of the department of agriculture, to which reference has heretofore been made, went through to its destination in exceptionally good shape.
    Reports to that effect have just reached the exchange. The car loaded with fancy Bartletts and accompanied by a representative of the department of agriculture, who made the trip with a view to testing the carrying capacity of perishable fruits on behalf of the authorities at Washington, left Medford August 21, consigned to a buyer at the national capital. It was one of the exchange's regular shipment transactions, and in the handling of this car the methods regularly employed by the organization were followed to the letter.
    In his report on this particular car, George W. Ayer, the Washington agent of the exchange, in part says:
    "We found the fruit in generally good condition, although two top tiers showed considerable ripe fruit. From the readings of the electric thermometer, we found that the temperature remained practically even from the point of shipment to Washington. In all, 32,820 pounds of ice were used on this consignment.
    "The Rogue River Fruit & Produce Association certainly has the right idea in regard to packing and loading cars. The fruit appears to have been well selected and sized; the boxes are made of good lumber; and the label is a neat and attractive one. The fruit was loaded right for long carrying."
    This car of pears, which left Medford August 21 reached Washington Sept. 2 with practically its entire contents in the best of condition.
    From the beginning, one of the prime purposes of the exchange has been to leave nothing undone that would in any way contribute safety and speed in the movement of the products entrusted to its care. At all points it has provided all possible safeguards against neglect, and upon its showing in this and other essentials it has made a reputation with the producers it serves and expects to continue serving.
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