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  • SOU complex opens, earns raves

    Initial group of students get a taste of SOU dormitory, dining room complex
  • Two new, state-of-the-art residence halls and a dining hall that features six restaurants and a convenience store are attracting students at Southern Oregon University, university officials say.
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  • Two new, state-of-the-art residence halls and a dining hall that features six restaurants and a convenience store are attracting students at Southern Oregon University, university officials say.
    Adroit Construction of Ashland wrapped up the combined 702-bed, suite-style dorms and dining hall, dubbed "The Hawk," in the first week of September, and students start moving in Sunday, said Tim Robitz, the school's housing director.
    The residence halls include several types of accommodations: four-room suites with two shared bathrooms, a living room and some with kitchenettes; and two-room semi-suites with one shared bathroom that can house either two or four students.
    There also are"super" single rooms, in which students can enjoy the privacy of a personal bathroom and bedroom while sharing a living room and kitchenette with one other student.
    All of the rooms have bike hangers and are outfitted with beds, a couch, chairs, desks, dressers, side tables and a dial to control room temperature.
    The top-of-the-line rooms come with bathtubs and showers, and all the kitchenettes feature marble countertops, because the university happened upon a great deal for the lavish stone, said Drew Gilliland, SOU director of facilities management and planning.
    The various room options range from $7,214 to $8,580 per academic year, according to information provided by the university.
    The new digs are a step below the university's Madrone Hall, completed in 2005, which has groups of four-person apartments in which students have their own bedrooms and share a living room, full kitchen and two bathrooms, Robitz said.
    The new residence halls, called Shasta and McLoughlin — or Waii-Ka and Maka Yax, as the Native Shasta people referred to the mountains — are each four stories tall and loaded with hand-selected student and local art, stylish furniture, water-bottle fillers, recycling rooms, flat-screen TVs in the commons areas, free washers and dryers, and study rooms.
    Waii-Ka — Shasta Hall — covers 105,039 square feet and includes 430 beds and 135 semi-suite, apartment-style rooms.
    Maka Yax — McLoughlin Hall, at 89,433 square feet, includes 280 beds and 78 suite-style apartments. Freshman are not allowed to live in this dorm.
    The residence halls received a silver rating under the LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) program, Robitz said, and are on the cusp of gold level, which the university may eventually reach.
    The LEED rating system, established by the U.S. Green Building Council, grades buildings based on such factors as indoor air quality, energy and water use, and the materials and resources that went into construction.
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