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MailTribune.com
  • September 28, 1913

  • September 28, 1913
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  • September 28, 1913
    Rain that fell generally throughout the Rogue River Valley Sunday amounted to .42 of an inch and was generally welcomed by farmers and growers putting the ground in shape for fall plowing which will be in full swing by the first of next week. The rain also cleared the atmosphere of the haze of smoke from small brush fires that have been hanging over the valley and settled the dust on country roads.
    During Sunday the rain came in intermittent downpours that put a damper on automobile excursions and kept people indoors. It failed, however, to halt the picking operations in the orchards, today's sun drying the trees. Fair and cooler and probable frost are predicted for tonight and tomorrow.
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    "With yesterday's rain the fire season is practically at a close," states Forest Supervisor M.L. Erickson. "Patrolmen are being taken off duty. The fire season has been an exceedingly satisfactory one. Less acreage within Crater National Forest was burned over than in any previous year and the fires that did occur were controlled at less cost. The total area burned over in the national forest was only 275 acres, and the cost of extinguishing the fires $340.
    "The Jackson County Fire Patrol Association and the state of Oregon board of forestry, working co-operatively, also report a lesser number of fires and less damage from them than last year. Last week's fires burning in the head of Kanes Creek, Foots Creek and on Lower Applegate River were the most serious the association had to deal with, but these fires destroyed mainly brush and young trees, little damage to mature timber resulting.
    "I attribute the excellent results chiefly to the care and consideration shown by the general public. Campers and hunters have been exceptionally careful and to them and to all the people using the forest the credit for the absence of fires is mainly due. Of the 34 fires extinguished this season, thirteen were started by lightning, four by hunters, one from a donkey engine and one from brush burning, nine from incendiaries and three from unknown sources."
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