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MailTribune.com
  • Come get your goat

  • Last month you had a story in your paper about goats being for sale at some rescue place out in the Applegate. I could sure use a few goats to help keep my blackberry bushes in check. But I can't remember where the place was. Can you help me?
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  • Last month you had a story in your paper about goats being for sale at some rescue place out in the Applegate. I could sure use a few goats to help keep my blackberry bushes in check. But I can't remember where the place was. Can you help me?
    — Ron W., Shady Cove
    Sanctuary One has got your goat, Ron. In fact, they have several.
    From tiny Nigerian dwarf goats to rangy alpines, the goats come in all shapes, colors and sizes.
    Tall or short, hairy or close-cropped, all of the goats are fun to watch, provide good companionship and are pretty good at pulling weeds, according to Sansa Collins, animal care manager at the Applegate facility at Double Oaks Ranch.
    So far only five goats have been adopted from last month's discount effort, Collins said.
    "We have some more pending adoptions in the next couple weeks. Until the others go, we have 17 up for adoption," said Collins.
    You're too late to get the discount rate of $50 for the first goat and $25 for each additional goat. That rate still applies to those who expressed interest in September, but needed extra time to arrange transportation and get fencing set up. Otherwise, the adoption fee remains at $150 per goat, Collins said.
    Collins hopes some folks will be able to provide homes for multiple goats that have formed strong bonds. So your request for a "few goats" is right up their alley, Ron.
    Depending on their previous interactions with humans, some goats are more comfortable providing up-close companionship than others, she said.
    No rams are available. All adoptees are either does or wethers. And lest you think you can adopt your four-legged bushwhacker and turn it out to fend for itself, Collins warns that a goat cannot live on lawn trimmings and blackberry bushes alone.
    Every prospective adopter will need be able to provide hay, hoof trimming and regular deworming medicine for their goats, she said.
    All of Sanctuary One's normal screening processes apply, she said.
    Until more goats are adopted, the shelter is full to capacity in roving lawn mowers and is not accepting new goats, she added. But they could use some hay to feed the hungry mouths they already have on hand.
    The care farm also is on the hunt for few good interns who would like to experience life on the nonprofit farm, she said.
    For information about adopting a goat, donating hay or volunteering, see www.SanctuaryOne.org or call 541-899-8627.
    Send questions to "Since You Asked," Mail Tribune Newsroom, P.O. Box 1108, Medford, OR 97501; by fax to 541-776-4376; or by email to youasked@mailtribune.com. We're sorry, but the volume of questions received prevents us from answering all of them.
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