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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Both Josephine and Jackson counties lost federal funds for the O&C land, so now the pressure is focused on increasing logging to compensate county funds. As an individual who has worked in the timber industry, I am alarmed that we are again focused on short-term solutions that result in long-term revenue loss.
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  • Both Josephine and Jackson counties lost federal funds for the O&C land, so now the pressure is focused on increasing logging to compensate county funds. As an individual who has worked in the timber industry, I am alarmed that we are again focused on short-term solutions that result in long-term revenue loss.
    Our local economy has evolved from excessive logging into many diverse businesses that are dependent on healthy forests. We have farms, dairies, wineries and a vast diversity of recreational businesses. Healthy forests provide clean water and a viewshed that encourages people to come to the area to enjoy the natural beauty. Degraded forests result in silted streams, springs drying up, and large tracts of land clearcut.
    Many timber workers are from small towns, as I am. We love to live in the country, away from the noise and turbulence of cities. We appreciate the forest for hunting, fishing, wildlife and general recreation. — Barry Martin, Williams
    Peter Buckley complained of Republicans "coordinating" an "attack" on Alan Bates' "bipartisanship" "a year from the next election."
    Even if it is true, there is nothing illegal or immoral about "coordinating," which Peter Buckley and Alan Bates probably are doing themselves. Aren't elected officials in a democracy accountable during their entire term in office, not just during an election?
    As to bipartisanship, it is not just throwing Republicans an occasional small bone, but an established procedure of frequent regular meetings with counterparts to discuss pending legislation. Please give us the actual dates and subjects of all of Alan Bates' meetings with his Republican counterparts during the last regular legislative session so that we can better judge the claim. — Fred A. Zerull Jr., Jacksonville
    Has anyone noticed that speed limits and, I may add, turn signals, are apparently optional in Medford?
    The frustration of the residents near "the curve" on Elm and Eighth hits home. We live on a posted 25 mph street, also with truck weight limit signs, where hardly anyone drives the speed limit and which heavy trucks frequently use as a shortcut. I have written letters to the mayor about the speeding, visited with traffic officers and talked to our neighbors (who acknowledge the speeding but "don't want to get involved." Is this the "community" we hear so much about?) to no avail.
    It is doubly frustrating when I know that a City Council member lives three houses from our speedway street and makes no obvious effort to curb the speeding or the trucks. This is a livability issue. But it seems clear to me that Medford sees unlimited growth as its driving force and to curtail speeding as something way down the list of priorities. Or maybe this city sees speeding as merely an annoyance to the ones who are affected by it. — Jerry Zelesnikar, Medford
    With the preliminary release of the latest IPCC report on climate and its clearly stated position that man-made warming is "unequivocal," it is now, more then ever, important to engage in discussions for solutions and sidestep the insignificant few skeptics, no matter how aggressively they use their special-interest support money to deny the facts.
    Now, the EPA, acting under direction of the U.S. Supreme Court, has proposed regulations that would control emissions from new coal-fired power plants. After spending years arguing that clean coal — with reduced atmospheric pollution — should be supported, coal companies now agree that clean coal is completely impractical. Kudos to the EPA for proposing regulations that start to solve the greatest threat facing humanity, but this is only a start. More is necessary. Our grandkids are depending on it. — Carl Prufer, Ashland
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