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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • We've recently witnessed the spectacle of a group of U.S. congressmen as they emerged from the room in which they discussed whether or not to shut down the government — their government — our government.
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  • We've recently witnessed the spectacle of a group of U.S. congressmen as they emerged from the room in which they discussed whether or not to shut down the government — their government — our government.
    They were sent to represent us as best they could in the halls of Congress. It is not unusual for a representative to differ from some of his/her constituents. By the very nature of our political system, it is a given. My representative does that with almost every vote he casts.
    But this time — this time it was different. No, it was not that he broke his party line and finally switched to the right side of history. It was the attitude that was different — it was the laughter of the emerging group. Where had I seen it before?
    It seemed so familiar. It was uncannily eerie. It was just like what we witnessed after 9/11 on the streets of Baghdad, and Tehran, and, Islamabad, and Kabul. Only worse.
    These guys were our guys — on our payroll — these were the ones who took a sacred oath to defend against all enemies, foreign and domestic — and it was just one big joke. — Seymour Collins, Ashland
    I just have to say that I am so fed up with the American people right now. I can't even read the paper or watch the news anymore without becoming angry and disappointed with how we're behaving.
    What's worse is that our elected officials, the people who are supposed to be leading our country and making us stronger, are doing the most damage. Our own president finds it appropriate to continually blame others. It's going to take efforts from everyone to fix things.
    When did we become a nation full of citizens with the attitude, "It's never my fault. It's always yours?" When did we become so politically correct and afraid of offending others that we lost our backbone and all ability to stand up for what's right? When did we become a nation that uses tragedies such as the recent shootings to press political agendas instead of mourning with those who've lost?
    We've become a nation of "me" instead of "we," and quite frankly, it disgusts me.
    We should be ashamed, but we're not. Maybe we do need to crash and burn a bit until we figure out what's really important and start building our nation back up. — Kimberly Chesney, Medford
    I want to thank Lin Scarrow and Allen Hallmark for setting us all straight in their recent letters to the Tribune. Now we all know what the real threat to America is: Republicans. After all, they are "terrorists," holding us all "hostage." It's alarming — "bomb-throwing anarchists" and "haters" are bringing the country to its knees. It's downright "unpatriotic."
    I just have a couple questions. Who are the real extremists, the real haters? What is it that will truly bring America down? — David Spear, Medford
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