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MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100: October 31, 1913

  • SALEM, Oct. 31. — At 8:25 this morning a little procession headed by Frank Seymour between two guards and closely followed by Mike Spanos, also between guards, marched down through the big dining hall at the prison and entered the death chamber in its southern end.
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  • SALEM, Oct. 31. — At 8:25 this morning a little procession headed by Frank Seymour between two guards and closely followed by Mike Spanos, also between guards, marched down through the big dining hall at the prison and entered the death chamber in its southern end.
    They were accompanied by Rev. Father Moore of this city, father Victor of Tigard and Father L.E. Miller of Fairport repeating the Miserere.
    Seymour ascended the scaffold with a firm step and turning faced the little crowd assembled.
    He stood apparently unconcerned as he waited for Spanos to take his place at his side.
    He said then at a nod from the warden he spoke in a firm and even voice:
    "I have but a few moments to live and I want to say with my dying breath that I hope I may be the last man in Oregon to go through the trap. I forgive everybody for all that has been done to me or is about to be done, and to say that I am innocent."
    As he stopped speaking, Spanos said:
    "With my dying words I want to say that we are not the boys who killed the man. The story I have told is true. I am ready to go. I forgive everybody and ask for forgiveness and shall pray to God Almighty for all of you."
    There was no tremor in his voice and somehow standing under the black wing of death, his words bore more conviction to most.
    In a moment the black caps were adjusted and the ropes placed, there was a harsh rattle as the trap doors dropped and a "chug" as the bodies shot down and jumped from the recoil of the rope.
    Seymour's body showed some signs of life, the muscles contracting and causing the body to squirm, but Spanos showed little or no motion. Seymour was cut down at 8:37 and Spanos, who showed wonderful vitality, at 8:45.
    Both men were optimistic last night and greeted their prisoners with a "good-bye" in as cheerful tones as they could under the circumstances. They were still hopeful at bedtime that intervention might come in their behalf and the other prisoners did what they could by word and look to bear them up in this belief.
    For more on the September 1912 murder of Greek immigrant George Dedaskalous and the prosecution of convicted murderers Mike Spanos and Frank Seymour, see www.mailtribune.com/100
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