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MailTribune.com
  • Parking lots planned for trail expansion at Roxy Ann Peak

  • I saw the story in the paper that the city is planning to create a bunch of new biking and hiking trails on Roxy Ann. That's fine (as long as the bike riders don't run me over), but I have a question: Where is everyone going to park if this new trail system brings in hundreds of cyclists? As it is now, cars are parked along t...
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  • I saw the story in the paper that the city is planning to create a bunch of new biking and hiking trails on Roxy Ann. That's fine (as long as the bike riders don't run me over), but I have a question: Where is everyone going to park if this new trail system brings in hundreds of cyclists? As it is now, cars are parked along the side of the road for quite a ways below the gate into the park. There's no way to add a lot more cars unless there's more parking.
    — Kathy L., Medford
    First off, a question: Why would bicyclists need a car to get to the mountain?
    Kidding aside, some cycling enthusiasts probably will ride up to Prescott Park at Roxy Ann, which would help with the parking situation.
    You're right, the current access to the park is a road, with no separate parking site, although there is room for parking alongside the road. However, regular users would likely agree there's not a lot of room for a big increase in vehicles. As a result, the city is considering two other trailheads — providing 70 to 80 parking spaces — for the park.
    The first trailhead and parking expansion will be just before the split in the road where trucks turn off to the gravel pit. It will be a gravel lot with 40 to 50 parking spots and portable restrooms. It will be the highest point that public vehicle travel will be allowed.
    A study of the trail system also recommended the city create another trailhead with about 30 parking spots near Bordeaux Avenue, to open up access to lower elevations of the park. Bordeaux Avenue is off McAndrews Road, near the Vista Pointe development.
    In all, the 34-mile trail system would cost $360,000 to $720,000, with trails crisscrossing the park's 1,740 acres. Elevations range from 1,960 feet to 3,576 feet at the peak, which is generally above the winter fog line.
    Phase 1 of the project calls for 10 miles of new trails at a cost of up to $200,000. The Parks and Recreation Department has $100,000 available and could apply for grants.
    New trailheads would be an additional cost beyond the trail system. Cost estimates indicate each trailhead would cost in excess of $50,000.
    Send questions to "Since You Asked," Mail Tribune Newsroom, P.O. Box 1108, Medford, OR 97501; by fax to 541-776-4376; or by email to youasked@mailtribune.com. We're sorry, but the volume of questions received prevents us from answering all of them.
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