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MailTribune.com
  • Hunters' reporting rate passes 80 percent

  • A flurry of hunters reported on their success, or lack thereof, in the 11th hour last week, pushing Oregon's mandatory-reporting rates over 80 percent for the second straight year since a $25 fine went into effect for non-reporting.
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  • A flurry of hunters reported on their success, or lack thereof, in the 11th hour last week, pushing Oregon's mandatory-reporting rates over 80 percent for the second straight year since a $25 fine went into effect for non-reporting.
    Oregon's deer and elk hunters inched their reporting rate to 81 percent before the Jan. 31 deadline, says Michelle Dennehy, Wildlife Division spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Two weeks before the deadline, the reporting rate had been hovering just over 50 percent, so the late surge again was evident, Dennehy says.
    Last year, the inaugural year in which non-reporters had to pay $25 before getting their next hunting license, the reporting rate was 85 percent for elk hunters and 84 percent for deer hunters, Dennehy says.
    The reason for the slip is not immediately understood, she says.
    "It's too early to make any analysis of it," Dennehy says.
    Those numbers, however, will creep up by April 15, which is the reporting deadline for hunters with deer and elk tags whose seasons slop into 2014, she says.
    Along with deer- and elk-tag buyers, those who purchased cougar, bear, pronghorn and turkey tags had to report information about their hunt by the Jan. 31 deadline. The only exceptions are for Sports Pac license holders who do not need to report on tags that were never issued to them.
    The information is used by biologists to set hunting numbers in limited-entry hunts, as well as to help improve the accuracy of computer-modeling population estimates.
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