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  • American Shiffrin wins women's slalom

  • KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — Normally so composed, so in control, so not-very-teenlike on and off the slopes, Mikaela Shiffrin suddenly found herself in an awkward position halfway through the second leg of the Olympic slalom.
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  • KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — Normally so composed, so in control, so not-very-teenlike on and off the slopes, Mikaela Shiffrin suddenly found herself in an awkward position halfway through the second leg of the Olympic slalom.
    Guilty, perhaps, of charging too hard as she swayed this way and that around the course's gates, Shiffrin briefly lost her balance. Her left ski rose too far off the snow. Her chance at a gold medal in the event she's dominated for two years was about to slip away.
    "Yeah, that was pretty terrifying for me. There I was, I'm like, 'Grrreat. I'm just going to go win my first medal.' And then, in the middle of the run, I'm like, 'Guess not,'" the American said with a laugh Friday night. "So like, 'No. Don't do that. Do not give up. You see this through.' My whole goal was to just keep my skis moving."
    Somehow, she did just that. Shiffrin stayed upright, gathered herself and, although giving away precious time there, was able to make a big lead from the first leg stand up. She won by more than a half-second to become, at 18, the youngest slalom champion in Olympic history.
    "It's going to be something that I chalk up as one of my favorite experiences for the rest of my life," Shiffrin said. "But my life's not over yet."
    No, Mikaela, it's not. It's only just beginning. Think about this for a moment: How might a typical American teenager have spent her Friday night? At the mall with friends? At a movie? At a high school dance?
    Shiffrin spent hers outracing the best skiers in the world down a floodlit Rosa Khutor course, knocking aside gates with her neon yellow pole handles. She was fastest in the first run, then sixth-fastest in the second, for a combined time of 1 minute, 44.54 seconds.
    A pair of Austrians won silver and bronze: Marlies Schild was 0.53 behind Shiffrin, and Kathrin Zettel was 0.81 back. At 32, Schild is the oldest Olympic slalom medalist ever — old enough to have been someone Shiffrin looked up to as, well, even more of a kid than she is now.
    "I won my age class," Schild joked.
    She holds the record with 35 career World Cup slalom wins and now owns three Olympic medals in the discipline, two silvers and a bronze.
    "You know what's surreal? That Marlies and Mikaela are on a podium together," said Shiffrin's father, Jeff. "Marlies, she's battled, she's had injuries, but she's been the queen of slalom. Mikaela has said, 'I've channeled Marlies.'"
    Shiffrin has won nine of the last 19 World Cup or world championship slaloms; no one else has won more than two in that span. Last year, her slalom world title made her the youngest champion in any event since 1985.
    Biathlon
    Ukraine's team of twins Vita and Valj Semerenko, Juliya Dzhyma, and Olena Pidhrushna missed five targets but avoided penalty loops to finish in 1 hour, 10 minutes, 2.5 seconds. Russia was 26.4 seconds behind to take silver, and Norway trailed by 37.6 to win bronze.
    Freestyle Skiing
    Marielle Thompson and Kelsey Serwa gave Canada its third 1-2 finish in freestyle skiing events in Sochi. The others came in men's and women's moguls. Canada also won gold and bronze in women's slopestyle skiing, and picked up a silver in the men's halfpipe, for a total of nine freestyle medals. In the skicross final, Ophelie David of France wiped out about two-thirds down the course, giving the bronze to Sweden's Anna Holmlund.
    Curling
    Canada's championship gave the country a sweep of the curling titles in Sochi. The Canadian women won their first-ever curling title on Thursday. Sweden won the bronze in men's curling, taking an extra end to defeat China 6-4.
    Speedskating
    Viktor Ahn, who was born in South Korea and became a Russian citizen in 2011, now has a career record eight short track medals. In addition to winning the 500, he anchored the Russian 5,000 relay team. He also became the first skater to win all four individual short track events at the Olympics. The U.S. team won silver in the relay, ending a medal drought for the American speedskaters.
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