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MailTribune.com
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

  • Regarding your recent Since You Asked column highlighting the plight of Oregon's-7 wolf and his meandering through Oregon and California, I am beginning to feel sorry for this lone wolf. As your headline terms it: "OR-7 still searching for love."
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  • Regarding your recent Since You Asked column highlighting the plight of Oregon's-7 wolf and his meandering through Oregon and California, I am beginning to feel sorry for this lone wolf. As your headline terms it: "OR-7 still searching for love."
    The wolf animal species by nature is a pack animal. Somehow OR-7 got separated from his northeastern Oregon pack. I was wondering, as the Department of Fish and Wildlife can track his exact whereabouts from the radio collar he is wearing, would it be feasible to tranquilize the animal and transport it back to the vicinity of his lost pack?
    If this could be accomplished without endangering the health of the animal, I should think this humane act would engender world-wide goodwill to the State of Oregon and the Department of Fish and Wildlife.
    Perhaps a member of that department would reply to that suggestion. — Jonathan Lucky, Medford
    Teachers have come forward against bullying by students and are purportedly working to reduce such occurrences. A worthy goal that is admirable, but then I become confused.
    They state one thing, but when they go out on strike apparently they and the MEA believe bullying and intimidation of substitute teachers, School Board members and teachers who choose to cross the picket line is appropriate when it helps to get what they want for themselves! They list teachers who cross the picket line on a "wall of shame."
    I say kudos to those teachers who crossed the picket line as they determined what was best for them and students for whom they care. If the striking teachers and the MEA representatives want to establish a "wall of shame" they should in fact be listed, not the teachers crossing the picket line. Such actions by striking teachers and the MEA are shameful and really do not set a good example for kids, but then it's all about the kids, isn't it!
    Maybe they should truly practice what they preach. Better yet, don't teach what they practice. — D. Jones, Medford
    Here we have information on what Syngenta has been doing to suppress a scientist that worked for them and his findings on the herbicide atrazine. This chemical is banned by the EU.
    A very informative article: http://bit.ly/1fc1LhI — He found that atrazine disrupts the endocrine system of frogs, interfering with male development and causing males to turn into females, and this presents a clear danger to humans.
    Syngenta is now trying to discredit him and prevent him from publishing and discussing his work with other scientists outside of their panel. Vote yes on 15-119. — Mardra Hord, Jacksonville
    As a student at RCC's criminal justice program, I and several of my fellow students attended court on Feb. 27 to gather materials we needed for an assignment. It just happened that we chose the courtroom where Judge Tim Barnack was presiding.
    At the end of the docket, his honor looked curious as to why there was a group of people still there, and for some reason asked me who we were. I quickly summarized who we were and why we were there.
    Immediately Judge Barnack invited us to ask any questions of him that we had, and for approximately the next 45 minutes we had unrestricted access to his knowledge. He came down from the bench and sat with us, and also invited us to take turns sitting in the position he normally occupies.
    The knowledge that we acquired in that brief time was incredible, and not things that our textbooks cover.
    On behalf of the students that were there that day I would like to say Thank You, your honor. The experience will not be forgotten. — Mark Bowen, Trail
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