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MailTribune.com
  • Ogden gave the valley its name in 1820s

  • How did the Rogue Valley get its name. I understand it has to do with the Rogue River, but what is so "rogue" about the Rogue River? Any ideas?
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  • How did the Rogue Valley get its name. I understand it has to do with the Rogue River, but what is so "rogue" about the Rogue River? Any ideas?
    — Jennifer T., Medford
    According to historical texts, Hudson's Bay Fur Company trapper and explorer Peter Skene Ogden began referring to the Rogue River in the late 1820s as "La Riviere aux Coquins," or "The River of Rogues."
    It is widely accepted that Ogden is the first European to have laid eyes on the Rogue Valley, which took its name from the river that formed it. Ogden chose "La Riviere aux Coquins," due to the nature of some of the Native Americans who lived in the valley when he arrived, according to his meticulous journals.
    Ogden arrived in the Rogue Valley on Jan. 24, 1827. With him was a party of about 30 people and nearly 100 horses. For Hudson's Bay Fur Company, Southern Oregon was the last unexplored area of North America south of the present-day border between Canada and the United States of America.
    According to Ogden's journal, he and his party camped along the Rogue River near Lower Table Rock and traded with local Native Americans in the area. The valley harbored bands of Shasta, Takelma and Rogue River Native Americans.
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