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  • OSU's Garrett brings energy to offensive coordinator role

  • CORVALLIS — It was the first day of Oregon State spring football and the Beavers were running one of their fly sweeps.
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  • CORVALLIS — It was the first day of Oregon State spring football and the Beavers were running one of their fly sweeps.
    Guard Sean Harlow charged downfield, hustling to stay in front of the ball carrier.
    First-year offensive coordinator John Garrett was so excited about the effort that he raced 20 yards to meet Harlow.
    "That's how we do it," Garrett shouted.
    That's Garrett's style, a constant state of intensity and high energy.
    It's an approach the players respond to and enjoy.
    "Even in meetings he's peppering us with questions, he's saying stuff to us, he's high energy all the time," quarterback Sean Mannion said. "It's very evident on the field but I think especially in meetings is when you notice it as well. You never feel like he needs a cup of coffee. You always feel like he's ready to go and ready to coach."
    It's an integral part of Garrett's coaching philosophy.
    Garrett, who made stops at Cincinnati, Arizona, Dallas and Tampa Bay in the NFL and the University of Virginia, said it comes from a love of football.
    "That enthusiasm and that energy is contagious and it's going to spread throughout the whole organization," Garrett said. "If it is contagious, then those guys are going to pick it up and they're going to feel the energy of us and the enthusiasm of us and it will pervade to the rest of the players on the team."
    Garrett expects that energy from the players as well.
    When a receiver catches the ball, Garrett expects the player to stretch out the sprint all the way to the end zone.
    There's no room for lollygagging.
    "He told me after practice, 'Hey, after every ball, burst after every catch,'" Richard Mullaney said. "You have to be a leader and after every ball, finish it and finish to the end zone.
    "By the end of this we're going to be in amazing shape because everyone's running to the ball, you have to finish in the end zone. It's really good. I love it so far."
    Garrett just completed his first week of on-field coaching for the Beavers.
    The Beavers had two mandated days in shorts and went with pads on Friday.
    "It's been three good days. We've got three days of installation in and we got to really take our time the first two days and it was a really great teaching atmosphere and then day three put the pads on and it speeds up the tempo a little bit," he said.
    "By no means is it perfect. We've got to improve everything, our operation, how we get in and out of the huddle, how we execute the plays, so we've got a lot of work to do."
    Mannion said Garrett focuses on the little things and never misses on those details.
    "Even the littlest things," Mannion said. "The way we hand the ball off, the way our feet are placed under center. The degree to which he focuses on detail is really impressive.
    "I know for me and all of our other quarterbacks, it's something we love to see. We love to be coached on every play and he does that."
    Mannion said Garrett has brought a fresh perspective to the OSU offense.
    He's constantly looking at aspects he can tweak or change for the better.
    "I think he's provided all those things and more," Mannion said. "I know a lot of the guys have been really, really impressed not only with the changes that have been made but how he's been in meetings and how he's been on the field as well."
    The offense is run at a high tempo.
    Garrett said that if something is important, then it should be done with urgency.
    The quick pace follows.
    "Everything's tempo," Mullaney said. "Between getting out of the huddle and looking at the coverage and knowing what you're doing. Everything is quick. Just know what you're doing and do it full speed."
    There's no Brandin Cooks and three starting offense linemen have finished their eligibility, but the Beavers do have Mannion back along with a good core group of experienced players.
    There's no rebuilding project facing Garrett, but he has plenty of pieces to fit together.
    "Everyone is a work in progress. So no one is just, 'OK, he's got that spot,'" Garrett said.
    "Sean Mannion has a lot of work to improve. All the guys that were productive last year, same thing. So that's our approach and every day we have to have the mentality that we're going to improve and get better and work hard."
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