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  • Mail Tribune 100

  • The Ashland Tidings contains the following regarding the record catch of Harry Hosler, Ashland's famous cane-pole bait fisherman, which was caught over a year ago.
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  • The Ashland Tidings contains the following regarding the record catch of Harry Hosler, Ashland's famous cane-pole bait fisherman, which was caught over a year ago.
    "Have you seen the big fish? All records were smashed and hood and line fishermen of the northwest who haunt Rogue River threw up the sponge when Harry Hosler of Ashland landed the biggest steelhead trout ever taken from the turbulent Rogue — or that will be taken from it in all probability for years to come — with hook and line. Take a squint at the big fish in Hosler's window and behold the figures, all you piscatorial artists who pride yourself on prowess. Here they are:
    Weight 18 pounds
    Length 36 inches
    Girth 18 inches
    Landing the average steelhead or cutthroat or even the more bulky and less active chinook salmon from the surging water of the Rogue is no child's play. To hook the prize steelhead from a swaying cable footbridge forty feet above the stream and come off victorious is a man's job. A look at Hosler and his decisive jaw is a convincing argument that there was a man on the job.
    The day he caught the big fish he had with him Joe Hurt, old-timer in the commercial fishing industry of the West, and Amon Nininger, who was reared in the valley of the Rogue — sometime after the Indians left.
    The three autoed to Ray Gold vicinity, 23 miles from Ashland, at early dawn. By 4 o'clock in the afternoon they had 63 steelhead and cutthroat and several big chinook salmon. At 4, Hosler started across the cable footbridge for the other shore. Here the river is 300 feet wide. Midway he dropped his line over "just for instance," he says. "Bang!" went his rod against the bridge railing and "Whirr!" went his reel. And from that on for exactly 46 minutes there was the prettiest fight ever seen in the Northwest between man and trout.
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