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MailTribune.com
  • April 28, 1914

  • (Glendale News)
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  • (Glendale News)
    "The Grants Pass Courier recently asked if there was anyone who could give any light regarding how Grants Pass received its name. The News has made some inquiries regarding this, and Mrs. M. Ellif, a settler of '52, tells us her version, which is, no doubt, the correct one. Mrs. Ellif, a young lady, then lived at which was then known as Ben Halstead's Ferry, across Rogue River, during 1853, living at the ferry, which was located about two miles from the present site of Grants Pass. This ferry was used for a number of years. She states that an Englishman by the name of Croxton bought the ferry from Ben Halstead and settled down there about the time of the Civil War. He was a Republican, as the new party was then called, and as the war progressed, became greatly interested in the career of U.S. Grant, who was in command of the union armies near the close of the war. To show his patriotism, he named the postoffice and settlement Grants Pass, and as such it became one of the important posts in Southern Oregon. Mrs. Ellif also said that when she lived there, there was no knowledge of such a man as Grant, though she has understood since that Grant was once on the coast, but she thinks it may have only been a rumor. The facts are as stated above, however."
    Mrs. Ellif is mother of Mrs. J.E. Enyart of Medford.
    u
    "Traffic in Souls," the photoplay that is to be presented at the Page Wednesday, has 700 scenes for which 600 people were employed, and the performance will be given from 1 to 11 p.m. Twenty-five cents will admit men, women or children to any part of the theater. it has been pressed by the National Board of Censors, the Chicago Board of Police and the Washington, D.C. district commissioners and all censor boards wherever it has been shown. It does a world of good for people in general and no one can afford to miss this chance to see it.
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