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MailTribune.com
  • Arrowheads were likely from the Shasta or Takelma tribes

  • I grew up in Phoenix and went to Phoenix Elementary School in the 1990s. The other day I remembered that when I was very young (before they remodeled the playground and took out the gravel, I think), my friend and I used to sometimes find arrowheads on the playground if we dug a little bit. We never told many people because w...
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  • I grew up in Phoenix and went to Phoenix Elementary School in the 1990s. The other day I remembered that when I was very young (before they remodeled the playground and took out the gravel, I think), my friend and I used to sometimes find arrowheads on the playground if we dug a little bit. We never told many people because we were maybe 5 years old and thought no one would believe us if we said we had found arrowheads. My friend moved away in late elementary school and took them with him. Was there a tribe living in this area, and if so, when? While I think we did in fact find arrowheads, it could also have been my 5-year-old memory.
    — E.J.S.
    American Indian tribes have lived in the area for approximately 13,000 years, with various tribes shifting across the land. But most recently, near the time of the arrival of European settlers, a band of the Shasta tribe as well as the upland Takelma tribe lived in the Bear Creek Valley, according to local archaeologist Jeff LaLande.
    Most of the Shasta lived over the Siskiyou Mountains in Northern California, but a band lived as far north as the Rogue River. The upland Takelma also lived in the area, and at various times were on friendly and unfriendly terms with the Shasta, LaLande said.
    On federal land, there are no criminal penalties for picking arrowheads up off the surface of the ground, but civil penalties could apply, he said.
    State law applies to non-federal public lands, such as land under city or county jurisdiction. There is no penalty for picking up and keeping arrowheads, although it would be preferable to let a local archaeologist or the State Historic Preservation Office know about a find, LaLande said.
    Arrowheads found on the surface or underground on private land belong to the land owner, he said.
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