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MailTribune.com
  • Phoenix marijuana dispensary remains open

  • Managers of The Greenery in Phoenix vow they will continue to stay open as long as they can "provide safe access" to medical marijuana, despite facing a court order by the city to close.
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  • Managers of The Greenery in Phoenix vow they will continue to stay open as long as they can "provide safe access" to medical marijuana, despite facing a court order by the city to close.
    The Greenery was given a 5 p.m. Friday deadline to voluntarily close dispensary operations at its Main Street location or be forced to close under court order.
    The Greenery is open today to provide medical cannabis to cardholders of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, managers said.
    Greenery Executive Director Andrea Adams said Friday she would fight to continue to serve the more than 4,000 medical marijuana patients who have used her nonprofit organization.
    Phoenix City Manager Steve Dahl said Friday city legal counsel will proceed with a request for an injunction at the start of business Monday.
    The city sent a letter last week asking The Greenery to close voluntarily. Adams said the city had not responded to her request for further discussion.
    Dahl said he also sent a police officer to the organization to deliver a copy of the letter by hand.
    "We were very clear that if they did not close voluntarily, we would proceed with the injunction," said Dahl.
    "We did not see a need to have another conversation," he said. "We have had multiple conversations this past year, and we were directed by the City Council to enforce the moratorium and take the necessary steps to close them down. That's all we have to say on the subject."
    Phoenix police earlier this year cited The Greenery 33 times for operating without a business license, but the tickets were dismissed by the city's Municipal Court.
    In March, Phoenix Municipal Judge James A. Wickre said The Greenery could not be cited for failure to obtain a business license because city codes prevented the business from receiving one.
    The city enacted a four-month moratorium on medical marijuana facilities in March, then passed a yearlong ban in May.
    The City Council on Monday will consider revising the wording of an ordinance that allows the city to cite businesses that do not obtain a business license.
    Mayor Jeff Bellah said the city would raise its maximum citable amount from $100 to $500 and include wording that would specifically prohibit businesses from operating without a license.
    Monday's meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the council chambers, 1000 South B St.
    Buffy Pollock is a freelance writer living in Medford. Contact her by email at buffyp76@yahoo.com.
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