|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Jacksonville considers housing code changes

  • JACKSONVILLE — Homeowners across the town must choose colors from a city-approved binder when it comes time to repaint. But they'll have a chance to voice their concerns about that limitation and other land-use issues during public forums in the coming week.
    • email print
  • JACKSONVILLE — Homeowners across the town must choose colors from a city-approved binder when it comes time to repaint. But they'll have a chance to voice their concerns about that limitation and other land-use issues during public forums in the coming week.
    One forum runs from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday. The other is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Both will be held at Old City Hall, 205 W. Main St.
    Revisions to codes that govern repainting, construction, remodels, lot divisions and development in historic areas and throughout town will be considered later this year. City officials are seeking opinions on the potential changes.
    "We want to give people a chance to come in and express their concerns about how things work now and what they'd like to see changed," said City Planner Amy Stevenson.
    She said she hears from residents frustrated over being limited in color choice and about how hard it is to remove a tree.
    Members of the city's Planning Commission, the Historic and Architectural Review Commission, Planning Department and a Citizens Advisory Committee will attend the revision sessions to hear public concerns.
    "Currently we have a binder of approved colors that everyone has to choose from when they paint. It's been that way for years," said Stevenson. "We may lessen that restriction if they are outside the historic landmark district."
    A draft version of the new code is nearing completion. A $14,400 grant helped pay for work on areas covering historic preservation. The state's Historic Preservation Office has provided input on that part of the code, and planning staff has also looked at model state codes for guidance.
    "The goal is to make things as clear as possible for applicants and to get their answers as quickly as possible," said Stevenson. "That's just good customer service."
    Under current codes, for example, tree removal requires a public hearing. That might become an administrative process under revised codes, said Stevenson. One desired goal is to reduce the number of public hearings.
    HARC and the Planning Commission will review the draft code from August through October and hold public hearings before making recommendations to the City Council. Stevenson would like to get the code to the council in January.
    Tony Boom is a freelance writer living in Ashland. Reach him at tboomwriter@gmail.com.
Reader Reaction

      calendar