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MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100

  • May 22, 1914
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  • May 22, 1914
    The two decisive defeats Bud Anderson underwent at the artistic hands of Leach Cross did not entirely eradicate the notion from his system that he can whip the man, according to letters received in this city from the former Pride of Medford, who is in Vancouver, B.C., training for a return match with Frank Barrieau, May 25.
    "They want to bring Cross up from Los Angeles for me to fight if I beat Barrieau," writes Bud. "They will have a chance to bring him up, for I can beat Barrieau within the limit, and nothing would please me any more than another crack at Leach. I will weigh in at 145 pounds, am feeling fine and expect to win in short order."
    The latter part of June, Bud and his mother are going to Los Angeles, and Medford friends see in this the beginning of a reunion with his old manager, Dick Donald. Bud will trade his 1913 Buick for a 1914 model and make the return trip by way of Crater Lake, spending the summer season in this city.
    u
    Mrs. Hart, living at Sixth and Bartlett streets, reported to the police two weeks ago that someone had stolen her pocketbook, containing $28, 20 cents worth of stamps, some pennies, hairpins, spectacle case, etc.
    This morning the purse was found behind a trunk, short 60 cents. The police hunted all one night to find the burglar that stole the purse, this being the theory upon which they worked.
    Mrs. Hart is of the opinion that the burglar who stole the purse suffered a change of heart after his theft, and put the purse back to ease his troubled soul, but Chief of Police Hittson thinks that the purse was laid on the trunk and dropped behind it when the lid was lifted.
    u
    J.W. Sneider has just installed a new Sharpie's mechanical milker, which was purchased through W.L. Chappelle of the Medford creamery. This machine will milk six cows at a time and draw milk from all four teats at once, therefore being able to milk twice as fast as six men milking by hand. The machine is adapted for milking 125 cows with sufficient power and equipment for 50 cows more by the addition of two more units, which can be supplanted at any time the herd is increased. The cost of the present installment is $1200.
    It is not the saving of help that makes the milker attractive, but it ads to the sanitary conditions of the milk, which Mr. Snider at all times has in mind.
    He is also having a complete water system put in with a pressure of 80 pounds, and when completed, which will be within a few days, the stables will all be flushed and kept sweet and clean at all times.
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