Breast Cancer Awareness
|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Concussions, ACL injuries focus of symposium

    Area medical professionals seek unified approach to sports injuries
  • Diverse views on concussions — prevention, detection and treatment — and how to deal with a common and debilitating knee injury will be at the heart of a symposium Wednesday organized by local medical personnel.
    • email print
    • SPORTS MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM
      when: Wednesday, 6 p.m.
      • WHERE: Smullin Health Education Center, Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center, 2825 E. Barnett Road.
      • TOPICS: Concussions will be focus, with three present...
      » Read more
      X
      SPORTS MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM
      when: Wednesday, 6 p.m.

      • WHERE: Smullin Health Education Center, Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center, 2825 E. Barnett Road.
      • TOPICS: Concussions will be focus, with three presenters discussing prevention, detection, treatment and effects. Leading off the program will be a session on anterior cruciate knee ligament injuries.
  • Diverse views on concussions — prevention, detection and treatment — and how to deal with a common and debilitating knee injury will be at the heart of a symposium Wednesday organized by local medical personnel.
    The 2014 Southern Oregon Sports Medicine Symposium will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Smullin Health Education Center at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center.
    The symposium is free and open to the public. Attendees should register at asante.org/classes-events.
    There will be four presentations, three of them related to concussions and one addressing prevention and management of anterior cruciate ligament damage. Questions will be taken after each.
    Interest in the event was sparked by a series of stories in the Mail Tribune last fall, said Richard Lotz, a family nurse practitioner with Southern Oregon Orthopedics. Lotz is a driving force behind concussion awareness at the high school and youth levels.
    The series of articles created interest among doctors and parents to present a unified front, he said.
    "It actually may have created as many questions as answers," said Lotz, who also is a consultant for USA Rugby. "There's quite a variability within the community on how concussions are treated, how knee ligament injuries are treated, so we found two specific areas that had major interest."
    If parents, athletes and primary care physicians are on the same page regarding concussion and knee injury criteria, he said, "we can better be consistent with our answers on our athletes.
    "The hope of giving it this way is that all the people who may be covering games or even the primary doctor who would see an athlete in the office would understand this is the protocol that's used."
    Dr. Todd Clevenger, of Southern Oregon Orthopedics, will be the opening presenter and will focus on ACL injuries.
    "The bottom line," he said, "is that preventing injury is always better than treating it. For anterior cruciate ligaments, there are certain things that can be done to prevent those. Not all of them will be prevented, of course, but there are certain workout and training regimens so the chance of injury can be reduced."
    His talk will center on prevention of athletic injuries, he said, because they are more predictable than random occurrences in everyday life.
    The three-pronged concussion event will follow.
    Lotz organizes concussion baseline testing prior to the football season for prep and youth teams and is on the sidelines during games on Friday nights.
    His presentation will be on preseason and field testing as well as return-to-play guidelines.
    Lotz will cover concussion symptoms, "what is and isn't a concussion," he said; how to evaluate athletes on the field and which players should and shouldn't be removed from play; and the protocol upon which those decisions are based.
    The second part, "Emergent Management of Traumatic Brain Injury," will be presented by Dr. Timothy Uschold, of Southern Oregon Neurosurgical & Spine Associates.
    "Unfortunately," said Lotz, "some of these injuries can go bad, and it's important to know how we treat athletes in the emergency room and afterward and what our treatment routines are."
    Uschold will talk about how to minimize the likelihood of concussions and how they occur.
    Dr. Michael Narus, a pediatric neurologist with Providence Medical Group who also works regularly with Doernbecher Children's Hospital, will give the third presentation on post-concussion syndrome and long-term outcomes of repeated closed-head injury.
    "It's really a well-rounded evening," said Lotz. "We'll have information that's very broad in nature, whether you're a doctor, nurse practitioner, PA, athlete, parent or coach. We'll have great information that will be applicable in regular life for everyone."
    The Smullin Center is located at 2825 E Barnett Road.
    Reach sports editor Tim Trower at 541-776-4479, or email ttrower@mailtribune.com
Reader Reaction

      calendar