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MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100

  • John Barker, a hay hauler and buyer, reported to the police this morning that he was robbed of $95 while asleep on his sleeping porch at his home on Riverside avenue Thursday night. The burglar gained entrance by cutting away the wire screen, inserting his hand and lifting the latch. Barker is very deaf, so the prowler had an easy time searching his clothes.
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  • John Barker, a hay hauler and buyer, reported to the police this morning that he was robbed of $95 while asleep on his sleeping porch at his home on Riverside avenue Thursday night. The burglar gained entrance by cutting away the wire screen, inserting his hand and lifting the latch. Barker is very deaf, so the prowler had an easy time searching his clothes.
    The $95 was the proceeds of hay sales the first week, and it is thought that the crime was the work of someone acquainted with the habits of Barker.
    Something of a wave of crime spread over the valley this week starting with the theft of $250 worth of silk from M. & M. department store, the robbery of the Talent post office of 30 cents, the theft of 50 turkeys from the Bradshaw ranch, and numerous petty stealings from clotheslines, gardens and hen houses.
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    The tranquility of the William Budge ranch was disturbed Thursday night by the report telephoned to the sheriff's office and the police of this city, that Roy Frick, one of the farmhands, had run amuck. When the storm subsided Roy Frick was found in his bunk, sane and sleeping.
    Frick and his brother had spent the evening in Medford, and on the way home lost each other. Arriving at the ranch, he began a search for Roy, and in so doing awoke Mrs. Stagg, the housekeeper, who inquired what was the matter.
    "I think Roy has gone crazy," was the facetious reply.
    Mrs. Stagg put a literal translation thereon, and immediately telephoned the sheriff's office and William Budge in this city. The sheriff's office hurried out, and Mr. Budge phoned back if he was crazy to be sure he did not burn up the barn.
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    Two acres of wild hay and weeds back of the Porter J. Neff home on Park Avenue was burned over by fire this afternoon, calling out the fire department for the ninth grass fire of the season. Back fires were set to keep the spread of the flames, which flared unusually high and hot for a grass fire. It encroached closely upon a couple of houses and a barn. A clump of old apple trees in the middle of the lot were scorched. About 500 people gathered to see the fire.
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