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  • 'Road' hero takes to the streets on a Brammo

  • In Anne and Gary Lundgren's latest movie project, a cyborg drifter risks his life to protect a woman who turns out to be a femme fatale — all in a lawless, post-apocalyptic State of Jefferson in the year 2049.
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  • In Anne and Gary Lundgren's latest movie project, a cyborg drifter risks his life to protect a woman who turns out to be a femme fatale — all in a lawless, post-apocalyptic State of Jefferson in the year 2049.
    "Black Road" is not only a noir thriller but a provocative think-piece that doesn't assail viewers with car chases and gun battles, says Gary, the film's writer and director.
    "Jefferson City (the fictitious Rogue Valley town) is a dangerous place. The protagonist, Dylan, gets hired by the femme fatale to protect her after her ex goes off the rails. Dylan is coming from a noble place, trying to start a new life in a place that can feel like the Wild West. Of course, the two get romantically involved."
    The Lundgrens hope to begin shooting July 21. The film will use a mostly local crew that has worked together here over the last decade, creating the Lundgrens' "Calvin Marshall" and "Redwood Highway." The almost $100,000 budget will be spent locally.
    Almost half of it, $44,000, is being sought in a Kickstarter campaign that ends July 6.
    The crowdfunding campaign is at http://kickstarter.blackroadmovie.com. It includes a video in which Sam Daly, who plays Dylan, comments that "Black Road" will be "more visceral, with larger-than-life characters" than 2013's "Redwood Highway," in which he also acted.
    "It has such an awesome script and cool concept," says Daly. "Oregon is so quaint and peaceful, and at the same time the majestic landscape can provide a dark, scary and alienating backdrop for a thriller."
    Daly has acted in "Grey's Anatomy" and "The Office." Most actors will hail from Los Angeles and some, as yet not cast, will be local.
    The filmmakers tried to use futuristic props, so Dylan rides the Ashland-made electric motorcycle, the Brammo Empulse.
    "The sleek design and futuristic look of the Empulse are perfect for the film," said Brammo CEO Craig Bramscher. "It was a partnership that just made sense."
    A compelling twist in the story, says Anne, who is the producer, is the relationship between Dylan, a former soldier, and his onboard artificial intelligence, Clyde, who has a mind of his own.
    Some scenes will be shot in Brookings. Rogue Valley scenes will be presented as happening by the ocean.
    The movie, following several others shot here and released in the past year, will help keep Southern Oregon in the forefront of desirable movie locations — and bring dollars to the region, says the film's consulting producer, Gary Kout of Southern Oregon Film and Television.
    "Jobs will be created. There will be positive financial impact. All the money will be spent here," Kout says. "It's about keeping the momentum going. This year, 2014, is going to be a remarkable year."
    "Calvin Marshall" is now on Netflix and "Redwood Highway" just finished a run in theaters. Also shot in Southern Oregon, "Night Moves" opens this week and "Wild" will be released at the end of the year.
    Ashland was just chosen the No. 2 town in the nation, Kout adds, in which to live and work as a moviemaker by MovieMaker Magazine.
    The Lundgrens believe most donors jump on Kickstarter in the last week, so they should be able to reach their goal. If they don't, they get nothing, according to Kickstarter rules.
    The crowdfunding strategy also serves to get supporters involved and watching the progress of the film with a sense of ownership, says Anne. The film departs from past work, she adds, by being crafted with a minimum of locations, to maximize efficient use of its modest budget.
    John Darling is a freelance writer living in Ashland. Email him at jdarling@jeffnet.org.
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