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MailTribune.com
  • Court plaintiff Hobby Lobby is a large chain of craft stores

  • I read with interest the news Monday that the U.S. Supreme Court sided with Hobby Lobby in ruling that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Obama's health care overhaul.
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  • I read with interest the news Monday that the U.S. Supreme Court sided with Hobby Lobby in ruling that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Obama's health care overhaul.
    Regardless of how I feel about that decision, I'm curious: What the heck is Hobby Lobby, anyway?
    — Alan B., Talent
    Hobby Lobby is a powerful consortium that advocates for such important issues as free trading card agreements, government subsidies for senior knitters and fewer taxes on AA batteries.
    Sorry, we couldn't resist.
    It's actually a chain of craft stores that started in Oklahoma City in 1972 and has grown to 600 stores in 47 states that generate $3 billion in annual revenue, according to the New York Times.
    Christianity plays a key role in the company culture. Stores play evangelical music and are closed on Sundays. A 10th of its profits are donated to charity, the Times reports.
    Hobby Lobby president Steve Green is opening a Bible museum in 2017 in Washington, D.C., to house his multimillion-dollar collection of ancient Bibles, Torahs and religious manuscripts, the Times says.
    When the company in 2012 announced its plans to file a lawsuit against the contraception provisions, founder David Green said:
    "We simply cannot abandon our religious beliefs to comply with this mandate."
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