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MailTribune.com
  • Our Opinion: Cheers and jeers

    Thumbs up to building surge, police; down to 'wearing other people's pants'
  • Cheers — to the surge in building that indicates the Rogue Valley's economic recovery is continuing. The value of new commercial and residential construction grew 31 percent in the fiscal year just ended over the previous year. Building hasn't returned to pre-recession levels yet, but it's moving in the right direction, and that's good news.
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  • Cheers — to the surge in building that indicates the Rogue Valley's economic recovery is continuing. The value of new commercial and residential construction grew 31 percent in the fiscal year just ended over the previous year. Building hasn't returned to pre-recession levels yet, but it's moving in the right direction, and that's good news.
    Cheers — to Medford police officer Levi Moffitt and Sgt. Jason Antley, who saved a drug overdose victim and helped put out a house fire in a single shift last week. Responding to the reported heroin overdose at 2 a.m. last Thursday, they administered CPR on a woman who had stopped breathing while waiting for paramedics to arrive. After an ambulance whisked the woman to the hospital, a fire broke out in a duplex about a block away. The pair beat firefighters to the scene and began spraying water on the fire with a garden hose. Firefighters quickly finished then job when they arrived. Sounds like Moffitt and Antley earned their pay that night.
    Jeers — speaking of Medford's finest — to the latest lame excuse officers are hearing when they find drugs in someone's pocket: "These aren't my pants, officer."
    As reported on the department's Facebook page, suspects are increasingly claiming to be wearing pants that they found at an unknown friend's home — pants that just happen to fit perfectly, and just happen to contain drugs, which naturally don't belong to the person wearing the pants.
    The police offered a bit of helpful advice: Don't wear other people's pants.
    Cheers — to the Grants Pass School Board, which had the good sense to approve a novel by award-winning writer Sherman Alexie, "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," for use as required reading in sophomore English classes next fall. The book ranked No. 3 on the American Library Association's 10 most challenged titles for last year's Banned Books Week.
    Objections to the book center on profanity and references to sexual self-gratification by the book's protagonist, a 14-year-old Native American boy. After the district's curriculum council recommended rejecting the book, board members agreed to read it themselves before deciding its fate.
    After doing so, all but one board member voted to approve the novel, saying they found it not nearly as objectionable as they had been led to believe.
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