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MailTribune.com
  • State marine board seeks citizen guidance

    Boaters can join ad-hoc committees to consider issues from sailing to waterskiing
  • The Oregon State Marine Board is taking applications from boaters looking to join ad-hoc committees representing various boating subsets to give the agency guidance on boating-related issues.
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  • The Oregon State Marine Board is taking applications from boaters looking to join ad-hoc committees representing various boating subsets to give the agency guidance on boating-related issues.
    The Marine Board is seeking to create three new Boat Oregon Advisory Teams, or BOATs, that will meet twice a year to give input on issues to the Marine Board and its staff.
    The teams will include Cruising (yachts, sailboats and runabouts), Outdoor Sportsman, including hunters and fishers who use their boats in their pursuits, and a Watersports team, whose members will range from waterskiers and wakeboarders to PWC riders and motorboat racers.
    Each board will have 10 to 15 members, and they will be asked occasionally to provide input on issues related to their fellow boaters or their region.
    Meetings are open to the public, and public interaction will be encouraged. Members will be asked to serve a two-year term with the option of an additional two years.
    Online applications for appointments to any of the specific boards will be accepted through 5 p.m. July 31.
    To get an application, see www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/BoatOregonAdvisoryTeams.aspx.
    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists are looking for volunteers to help hand-water native plants and trees planted earlier this year along the banks of White City's Whetstone Creek and Medford's Larson Creek as part of a habitat-improvement project there.
    Participants will be asked to water the plants before noon twice a week, preferably on Wednesdays and Fridays, through September.
    Volunteers will be asked to fill buckets of water from a tank mounted on the bed of a pickup truck and pour the water onto the plant stocks.
    The hand-watering is considered essential to the project's success because new riparian plantings typically need help taking hold in their first three years. The stretch of Whetstone Creek is within the Denman Wildlife Area and the other is on the lower stretch of Larson Creek.
    For more information, call ODFW biologists Dan VanDyke or Chuck Fustish at 541-826-8774.
    A July 11 Oregon Outdoors story on work that volunteers from the Siskiyou Mountain Club have done to reopen the Trans-Kalmiopsis Trail understated the number of down trees cut with handsaws to make way for hikers on the 26-mile route. Crews cut more than 600 trees this year alone, with a total of 2,200 trees since the project began in 2010.
    Reach reporter Mark Freeman at 541-776-4470 or mfreeman@mailtribune.com. Follow him at www.twitter.com/MTwriterFreeman.
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