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MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100

  • The existence of a gang of expert thieves and cracksmen in the valley was further made known by the confession of E.R. Erom, the Portuguese burglar, to the city police, that he had seen a gang of cracksmen at work preparing liquid nitroglycerin called "nitroglycerin soup," for cracking a safe in Jacksonville.
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  • The existence of a gang of expert thieves and cracksmen in the valley was further made known by the confession of E.R. Erom, the Portuguese burglar, to the city police, that he had seen a gang of cracksmen at work preparing liquid nitroglycerin called "nitroglycerin soup," for cracking a safe in Jacksonville.
    According to his story, the gang of men, the names of which he says he does not know, obtained dynamite in the graveyard, where it is used for blasting graves. The manufacture of the liquid is carried on by the soaking of the dynamite in water, the water dissolving the nitroglycerin in the dynamite. The "soaking process" took place in a vacant house, and Erom says he overheard the plot to dynamite a large mercantile establishment at Jacksonville. He described the store as being opposite the white-front bank, and said he was not in the plot or a member of the gang.
    The nitroglycerin did not go to waste, although the Jacksonville job was abandoned, for on the same night the Jacksonville store was to be blown, the safe of the Johnson Saloon at Gold Hill was robbed of $15.
    u
    Joe Knowles will have a hard picking to maintain a primitive existence in the forests of Josephine County as he plans, according to Judge William Colvig, Southern Pacific tax and right-of-way agent, who states that for a quarter of a century he has hunted and fished over nearly every mile of territory in which Knowles proposes to live.
    "I hunted that country for years," declared Colvig today, "and once had a hard enough time to kill a deer with a Marlin rifle, to say nothing of catching one without any gun. He will need to kill a deer or some animal from which he can obtain a substitute for string. To my knowledge there is no bark in the country from which strings can be made.
    "There are many fish in that country, and he may be able to live on these, but I doubt if he gets any game."
    Mr. Colvig believes that the nature man will have a hard task to "lose" himself in the forest. He says that the country is completely netted with trails.
    "That country has been tracked for years by miners, and I'd like to see anyone hide himself. The woods are filled with cabins and many of these are stocked with food and pack outfits." — Eugene Guard.
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