|
|
|
MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100

  • W.E. Williamson, for many years a resident of Medford, has organized the Interurban Auto Car company, and will shortly after the first of the month install a regular service of auto cars between Central Point and Medford. As soon as the highway pavement is completed toward Ashland, the service will be extended to that city and intervening points.
    • email print
  • W.E. Williamson, for many years a resident of Medford, has organized the Interurban Auto Car company, and will shortly after the first of the month install a regular service of auto cars between Central Point and Medford. As soon as the highway pavement is completed toward Ashland, the service will be extended to that city and intervening points.
    The cars to be used are the most approved type of White cars, the pay as you enter style, and are roomy and comfortable. Hourly service will be provided, or as often as the patronage warrants. The fare will be 25 cents round trip to Central Point, and the schedule time will be as fast as the speed laws permit. Stops will be made anywhere along the road and all the benefits of a trolley line will be conferred upon the populace.
    u
    LONDON, July 27 — Glimmers of Hope flickered in the darkened sky of European politics today and the wish was general that the efforts of the great European powers to avert a clash of arms, which might involve many nations, would be successful.
    Lack of confirmation of the early report of a hostile encounter on the Danube between Servian and Austrian troops, and Sir Edward Grey's efforts to obtain the consent of the leading European nations to mediate led to a belief today in the possibility of avoiding armed conflict between the European nations.
    France and Italy have accepted the British foreign secretary's proposal of a conference between the ambassadors in London of the powers.
    Attention was turned in the chancellories of Europe to the attitude of Emperor William after the conference with his advisers on his return to Germany and also to the activities of Russia.
    Preparations were continued by all the powers to deal with eventualities.
    While all the powers were preparing for possible eventualities, their statesmen, with Sir Edward Grey, the British foreign Secretary, at their head, were endeavoring to bring together the governments at issue, with a view to mediation.
Reader Reaction

      calendar