As a concerned, local parent, each year for the past five-plus years, a few weeks before June approaches, I know graduation time is approaching and I tell myself, "I'll be reading another article in the Tribune about teens and a car wreck." And sure enough, it happened again — it happens nearly every year.

As a concerned, local parent, each year for the past five-plus years, a few weeks before June approaches, I know graduation time is approaching and I tell myself, "I'll be reading another article in the Tribune about teens and a car wreck." And sure enough, it happened again — it happens nearly every year.

What's the deal? Whether the passengers or the driver in the car are teens or young emerging adults, where are their wise decision-making and defensive driving skills?

Do they not get the information/education they have received from schools, teachers, parents, friends and other significant family members, let alone the media that continue to print another tragic teen vehicular accident? Are these teens so stupid (yes) to think nothing will happen to them whether as a driver or passenger?

All the education in the world doesn't seem to matter to the driver. It is a choice to be a responsible driver — listen to your passengers, if that; and remember it's stupid to drive recklessly/non-defensively, under the influence or not. — Cori Cooper, Phoenix

Imagine, if, after 1973, when the first oil embargo occurred, the United States had done what Japan did, adopt real energy conservation. But, of course, special interests, short-sighted politicians and subsequent administrations took the easy path and did nothing.

Now, having wasted decades, the United States is forced to face the inevitable consequences of high oil prices and increasing shortages. A Democratically-controlled Congress has finally acted to begin a painful readjustment. Let us hope that conservation finally wins out. — Frank R. Hieber, Medford

I read someplace, probably in the Mail Tribune, but it could have been one of the national newspapers, that automobile mileage will be raised an average of 35 mpg. Well, that's what I read. Wow!

In 1978, I bought a Honda Accord. Nifty little automobile. It could take either leaded or unleaded gasoline. But what was the most nifty was the advertised mileage. Travel at 55 miles an hour, you would get 38 miles to the gallon.

So I traveled from Los Angeles to Las Vegas, my home then, at 55 miles per hour, and the car registered 38 miles to the gallon. Now that was in the last century, 29 years ago.

Draw what conclusions you will, but as you draw, remember the auto industry in America is not our friend, the gasoline industry is not our friend, and Congress and this president are not our friend.

Twenty-nine years ago I owned a very good automobile that got 38 miles to the gallon traveling 55 miles an hour. — Sidney E. Goldberg, Ashland

I would like to thank the Phoenix Police Department and Chief Kurt Barthel for their kind gesture of replacing a tattered American flag at the Medford Rehabilitation and Health Care Center.

It is very refreshing to read about good deeds being done in the community, as a majority of the "news" these days is negative and worldwide. And thanks to Steve B. for bringing this event to light with his grumble in the June 20 Since You Asked. I'm sure most Phoenix citizens would be proud. — Randy Miltier, Phoenix