American politics is extremely divided these days. This is shown with the current rhetoric about Iraq, in addition to the talk of possible war with Iran.

American politics is extremely divided these days. This is shown with the current rhetoric about Iraq, in addition to the talk of possible war with Iran.

On one hand, America's pacifist wing of the far left openly espouses that a world without war is possible if only we imagine it. On the other hand, our far right talks as if war doesn't require critical thought about long-term consequences.

Obviously, both extremes of America's political spectrum are unrealistic about war.

In today's world, war is still justified when one's country is attacked or when the international community comes together to face threats. Afghanistan, Kosovo and Desert Storm met today's definition of acceptable warfare.

However, due to globalism, pre-emptive wars such as Iraq are now frowned upon internationally. The modern mind-set doesn't easily justify one country attacking another as the best way to deal with fears about that country.

Regarding Iran, Ahmedinejad is alarming. However, those wanting to attack Iran should remember that the Soviet Union was even more threatening and we never attacked them.

Through various means, we eventually wore the Soviet Union down and won the Cold War. It may be best to apply similar methods to Iran. — Perry Casilio, Talent

No, Mr. Bush, I don't want you impeached. I want you, Cheney, Rove and Libby thrown into prison for the rest of your natural lives.

You have thrown away the lives of almost 4,000 good Americans. You have crippled for life thousands of great Americans. You have killed thousands of innocent civilians as well. We have hundreds of our soldiers trying to commit suicide, because of the loss of their families, and the mental torment they suffer when they return. I'm very much aware of this because, unlike you, Mr. Bush, I fought in the other lie called Vietnam. And do suffer from PTSD.

Mr. Bush, I don't know what god you say you talk to for advice, but my god stands for love and telling the truth. I don't believe your god does. Mr. Bush, you have disgraced this country long enough. Follow Mr. R. Nixon. Please resign, and take your hateful followers with you. Your lies have caught up with you. — Michael A. Long, Trail

Methford! It's embarrassing enough to be the meth-infested drug capital of Oregon, but now we are infested with beggars!

On nearly every corner of most of the busy intersections of Medford are homeless or nearly homeless beggars. We need a law against this now. Get them off our streets. From the homeless beggars to the meth-addicted thieves.

We need better laws and law enforcement and a lot better prosecution and detainment. Get them off our streets. Now. Spend my tax money on more law enforcement and more jails. I am tired of having to coexist with these people.

As angry as I get over the illegal immigrants in our country, at least they came here to work! — Allen Stewart, Jacksonville

editor's note: The following letter appeared in Saturday's paper with an editing error.

President Bush keeps telling us over and over, "The terrorists hate us because we're a nation of freedom."

Baloney. If that were true, al-Qaida would be targeting Canada, Norway, Belgium, Japan, Austria and the Netherlands. The simple fact is, they hate us because America's been giving weapons to their enemies since 1948.

Al-Qaida's attitude is, "All people must live and think like we do, or we'll exterminate 'em." This mentality is remarkably similar to the mind-set of those Bush cheerleaders, Falwell, Robertson and Dobson — one nation, ruled by religious decrees set forth 2,000 years ago, with mandatory obedience and horrible punishment for any who disagree. As in, "All females shall be obedient unto the husband, producing babies, making tuna casseroles and mopping floors." As in, "Homosexuals shall be cast into a pit of fire. As in "All the unbelievers must be punished." As in "Eating such-and-such food is an abomination." Jeez, talk about people who hate freedom!

Fundamentalism — of any kind — is anti-everything that America stands for. It represents compulsory, dictatorial, no-choice obedience under threat of punishment, with no freedom for anyone. Amazing how Bush never figured this out. — James Snyder, Medford