I'm so astounded by the article regarding the murder of the mother of the two orphan fawns I'm finding it hard to stay civil. I'm correct — a doe, not a black bear?

I'm so astounded by the article regarding the murder of the mother of the two orphan fawns I'm finding it hard to stay civil. I'm correct — a doe, not a black bear?

Living near upper Cherry Lane we have families of deer. I can think of no situation that would require me or my neighbors to call and have any one of them murdered. Much less the mother, leaving two orphans to die alone. — P. Moran, Medford

Today's Mail Tribune featured an article by Mark Freeman regarding a Medford woman's photo of her children harassing gulls at Harris Beach State Park and reported that the photo was to be a part of the Oregon State Parks Department 2008 calendar.

Mr. Freeman, with great experience as an outdoorsman, and the state of Oregon should both know that the action depicted is illegal. Chasing or harassing wildlife is prohibited under ORS 498.006. — Jim Harleman, Central Point

Do you really think the Democratic Congress will end this war?

Dave Robinson from Catholic Peace Voice writes: "No one is going to do for us what we are not willing to do for ourselves. Another 1,000 empty seats at family tables is an unacceptable and inevitable result of the decisions that each of us make this summer. Any decision on our part to sit back rather than step up will ultimately be accountable to that terrible fact."

I challenge all people of faith to join us each Wednesday at 10 a.m. at Vogel Plaza for a 30-minute silent vigil. We are Women In Black, but we are a local group so we have tailored it to the community's needs. You don't have to wear all black and men are welcome.

You drive by and thank us, give us "thumbs up" and some of you even park your car and come over to hug us. But we need your physical presence to send a message to our community and to our elected officials. Please, let's abolish apathy ... take a stand! — Beth Baker, Central Point

The racially-charged altercation that occurred in downtown Medford last week should come as no surprise. Incidents motivated by race and driven by hate are more common than our collective conscience allows us to admit. I am a 42-year-old black man. As a Medford resident, I have never felt threatened.

But, I am not naïve. Race permeates American culture. Throughout my travels around this country I have never failed to encounter a case of either blatant racism or obvious hate.

The progress that this country has made in the form of racial equality and justice is diminished by the intolerance and indifference that still exists. Fortunately for all concerned, decent communities stand against this type of behavior. The citizens who came to the defense of the victims in this dreadful attack displayed the best of what humanity has to offer — to come to the aid of those distressed.

By boldly confronting the criminal actions of the two thugs, the people sent a message: We all are welcome to partake in and enjoy what this city has to offer — free of harassment. Let's only hope the criminal justice system completes its duty and delivers due punishment. — Kelvin James, Medford