Wayne Regula won't be taking bull from his bovine much longer.

Wayne Regula won't be taking bull from his bovine much longer.

His 2-year-old bull, Lucky, catapulted the 85-year-old Evans Creek Road man through the air Monday morning, smashing him into a metal storage shed.

Mercy Flights rushed Regula to Providence Medford Medical Center with what looked like just a gash to his neck.

But doctors found Regula had three broken ribs, a fractured neck and a contusion, and he's got a few stitches and staples, said his daughter Donna Funk. Despite all that, he's stable, she said. But he wants to get rid of the ornery bull.

"He's alert and clear of mind," she said. "He's sore, and he's discouraged. He's not happy. But he's hoping to come home tomorrow if he remains stable."

Funk's 13-year-old daughter, Nicole, saw the attack. She said her grandfather told her afterward he is fed up with the bull. "Grandpa says, 'To hell with him,' " she said.

During the storm Sunday night, more than a dozen of the Regulas' cows got out of the pasture. All were herded back in the morning except Lucky, who was being difficult, said Nicole.

She watched while her grandfather fetched some firewood later in the morning. The bull stomped up to him.

"It threw him over his head," she said. "The bull started pushing him into the bushes. It started to bellow and kick up the dirt."

Eventually, Lucky left Regula alone and Nicole called 9-1-1.

As bad as the bull has been, Wayne Regula's wife, June, said it won't become hamburger meat if she has anything to do with it — despite what some of her relatives have suggested as they prepare for a family Thanksgiving.

"We raised him from a baby," she said. "He's just a young bull."

June Regula, 82, said she's going to try to find another ranch that might want to give her 1,200-pound pet a good home. "We'll find a place for him," she said.

Lucky got his name because he was hand-fed by humans with a bottle. He was nursed back to health after he broke a leg. Lucky's become so used to humans he's not afraid of them. "All the kids played with him," June Regula said. "He thinks everything's a joke."

She said she's learned a good lesson about treating bulls as pets. "You don't play with the bull," she said.

Nicole said Lucky was gentle with her in the past as she helped raise him.

"He was nice and stuff, but all of a sudden ...," she said.

Lucky stomped and bellowed defiantly Monday at humans, who gazed at him safely from the other side of the fence.

Wayne's grandson Jacob Kinsman, 30, said the only thing that keeps Lucky in line is his dog, Bandit, who happily chased the belligerent bull around the pasture.

Kinsman said Lucky has even threatened him recently. "The bull pinned me up against the barn," he said.

Other bovines in the pasture didn't seem to mind Lucky's unruly behavior of late.

"The cows like the bad boys," said Nicole.

Reach reporter Damian Mann at 776-4476 or dmann@mailtribune.com.