The Medford School Board needs to recognize that rehabilitation for older schools in existing neighborhoods is important for long-range urban planning.

The Medford School Board needs to recognize that rehabilitation for older schools in existing neighborhoods is important for long-range urban planning.

To build only new schools in newer areas encourages sprawl and undermines efforts to develop in-fill in older urban areas. The School Board has a definite responsibility to consider the impact of its decisions on land use, which is far more important than the school district's short-term financial issues. — Conde Cox, Jacksonville

Having three middle schools justifies building the new high school.

With three middle schools, valuable hands-on-activities will be available to more students. I can envision healthy competition within and between the three middle schools in sports, debate, chess, rocketry, cards, cooking, etc.

Would it be possible to allow each individual sixth-grade student a choice between attending a modified self-contained middle school classroom or attending an elementary school classroom? — Bill Hartley, Medford

"We seek your leadership. But if for some reason you are not willing to lead, leave it to the rest of us. Please get out of the way." From the Papua New Guinea delegate to the U.S. representative at the United Nations climate conference in Bali. Met by cheers from every country present except the United States.

Wow! This is what our once great nation has come to, given its rejection of the Kyoto protocol and its unwillingness to develop pollution-reducing technology and share it with the rest of the world. We pollute more than anyone except maybe China, but we say "no" when it comes to taking a leadership role in cleaning up the mess.

Disgusting! It makes me want to weep with shame for my country.

Somewhere there must be a leader for the USA who can do better than this. — Craig Callaway, Eagle Point

Here are a few things to think about:

Taxpayers in Medford will pay $60.4 million for the cost of the Iraq War through 2007. For the same amount of money, the following could have been provided:

3,024 people with health care, or 56,823 homes with renewable electricity, or 1,289 public safety officers, or 1,112 music and arts teachers, or 10,769 scholarships for university students, or six new elementary schools, or 374 affordable housing units, or 18,065 children with health care, or 8,961 Head Start places for children, or 1,058 elementary school teachers.

What a shame! We should all be wearing sackcloth and ashes. — Walt Wright, Medford