Regarding the Wall Street Journal's editorial "We're all Keynesians now" (Jan. 21), the Journal's editorial writers need a refresher course in Econ 101.

Regarding the Wall Street Journal's editorial "We're all Keynesians now" (Jan. 21), the Journal's editorial writers need a refresher course in Econ 101.

In pooh-poohing the idea of a stimulus package for the present downturn, it says that the "one-time rebate check they may now receive has to come from somewhere either by taxing or borrowing from someone else." The essence of Keynesianism is deficit spending, which means the creation of the money to spend by the Federal Reserve.

And, on a different topic, on the same opinion page as above, I can never see where Paul Greenberg is coming from. In his opening lines of "The radical as conservative" he comes up with a truly unique definition of "conservative."

He says "the very definition of an American conservative is someone dedicated to preserving the gains of a liberal revolution. Preserving liberalism is not most people's idea of conservatism. Subsequent reading does nothing that I can see to clear this up. — Harry L. Cook, Ashland

Why did ODOT install blunt concrete center island impact ends on the Barnett Interchange project? The impact ends installed by ODOT on the Highway 62 project on Highway 62 and Poplar have ramp impact ends.

I personally was forced into the blunt impact end on Barnett at a cost of a new $300 tire (it could easily have been four tires instead of one, but my tires were almost new). I if it had been a ramp, more than likely there would have been no damage.

The damage would be quite extensive to a smaller vehicle, according to the tire people who replaced my tire.

Same designer on both projects, ODOT!

ODOT, are you going to reimburse me and other drivers who have similar problems? Look at the rubber marks on the Barnett island already. — Terry Johnson, Medford

We citizens hear commentary and reports on presidential candidates' poll popularity, funding gains, how they're feeling at this stage of the campaign, and what they promise if elected — all of which have little or nothing to do with how they really might run the country. Yet, in a democracy, we've been entrusted to choose wisely.

SmartVote.org gives basic information about candidates' actual voting history. Citizens can click on a candidate's name, then on the "voting record" link under the candidate's photo. At the linked site, click on each bill and see, briefly, what the bill was about. An outstanding service.

Go to: http://votesmart.org/election_president_search.php?type=alpha. In addition, the FactCheck.org site is good for checking out innuendo and blatant falsehoods in candidates' ads.

Here's where to check for the biggest whoppers by both Democrats and Republicans during 2007:

http://www.factcheck.org/elections-2008/the_whoppers_of_2007.html. — Diana Morley, Talent