MEDFORD — A former Medford police officer accused of threatening a wayward teenager with a stun gun will appear in court this spring on misconduct and menacing charges.

MEDFORD — A former Medford police officer accused of threatening a wayward teenager with a stun gun will appear in court this spring on misconduct and menacing charges.

Travis Henson, 35, was placed on administrative leave soon after May 28 when he reportedly threatened to shoot a juvenile runaway in the eye with a Taser. He resigned from the department in October.

Medford police completed their internal investigation last fall. Henson resigned before the department informed him of any disciplinary measures he faced.

"We were moving down the path we were going to take when he resigned," Medford police Chief Randy Schoen said.

Schoen declined to say if Henson was going to be fired or receive a reprimand for the incident because he doesn't want the internal affairs' findings to sway a jury in the court case.

Henson is scheduled to appear April 23 in Jackson County Circuit Court. He faces charges of first-degree official misconduct and menacing.

Henson allegedly threatened the 15-year-old after apprehending him twice in a 12-hour period. The teen had fled the Jackson County Juvenile Justice Center.

The alleged mistreatment occurred during the second trip back to the center, officials said.

The criminal case was handled by Oregon State Police and reviewed by Douglas County Deputy District Attorney Colin Benson.

Jackson County District Attorney Mark Huddleston farmed the case out to Benson to avoid a conflict of interest.

"This is the way these incidents are normally handled," Medford police Deputy Chief Tim George said. "It is the way it should be done."

Henson joined the department in July 2003 following a stint in the Oregon State Police after graduating from Eagle Point High School.

In addition, he is a commissioned senior reserve officer with the U.S. Coast Guard. He worked on patrols off Cuba between May 2004 and January 2005.

Schoen lamented the loss of a good officer, but said the department cannot tolerate anyone compromising the public's trust in the agency.