Chicken soup may be the all-American cold and flu panacea, but around the world, people turn to all manner of culinary curatives for chills and sniffles.

Chicken soup may be the all-American cold and flu panacea, but around the world, people turn to all manner of culinary curatives for chills and sniffles.

Research has shown many ingredients used in these dishes are healthy and that chicken soup really can make you feel better.

Here's a sampling of folk remedies from around the world:

China — A head-clearing soup is made by steeping crushed, fresh ginger with a small amount of sugar in boiling water for 30 minutes. Korea — Green tea with lemon is popular, as is the ubiquitous Korean condiment kimchi (a pickled vegetable dish). Mexico — A potent tea is made with honey, lemon and plenty of cinnamon. Another popular option is an infusion of garlic, lemon and honey. Morocco — In this North African nation, a very garlicky omelet is made with olive and plenty of black pepper. Pakistan — Turmeric is boiled in milk with sugar then consumed hot, often with a spoonful of ghee (clarified butter). Philippines — A chicken soup made with onion, garlic, fresh ginger, fish sauce, green papaya and chili leaves is believed to have great restorative powers. Thailand — Tom yum soup, traditionally made with chicken stock, lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, garlic and hot chilies, is a popular cold remedy. United Arab Emirates — Sliced hot chili peppers, chopped garlic and onions cooked in olive oil. Uzbekistan — In this former Soviet nation, a cup of hot milk is mixed with a tablespoon of honey and a tablespoon of melted lamb fat or butter.

— The Associated Press