It may well be that the MT does not favor publishing opinions that are too "radical" and/or unfavorable about our governing bodies, local and federal. So I have "toned down" my normal anarchic rhetoric in favor of posing just a few simple questions (to the ruling elite, be they local or national).

It may well be that the MT does not favor publishing opinions that are too "radical" and/or unfavorable about our governing bodies, local and federal. So I have "toned down" my normal anarchic rhetoric in favor of posing just a few simple questions (to the ruling elite, be they local or national).

1. Does the tiny town of Jacksonville truly require new facilities for its handful of leaders, policemen and firemen?

2. Does the city of Medford need to "grow"? (Is it too short?)

3. Why are the libraries not funded out of a portion of the property taxes (as are the schools)? Libraries are certainly as important as schooling ... yes?

4. Why do we the people allow our local "leaders" so much gestapo-like control (as at meetings), etc? I await some truthful answers. — Duane Sample, Jacksonville

Last year, the Phoenix City Council asked a citizens committee to help them deal with the city's financial difficulties. Finding stable funding for fire protection and emergency services was a major priority.

After exhaustive research, the committee recommended that the city annex the fire department to Fire District 5. This consolidation was the most cost effective long-term solution for the city that would continue the level of service Phoenix residents wanted while providing stability for our firemen.

Fire District 5 began providing service to Phoenix in October under contract until ballot measure 15-82 in Phoenix can be voted on during the March 11 election. If the measure is approved by Phoenix and the district, then permanent annexation would take place on July 1, 2008.

The Phoenix Citizens' Connection Committee recommends a "yes" vote on measure 15-82. More information is available on the Web at http://citizenscc.homestead.com. — Brian J. Lewis,co-chairman, Citizens' Connection Committee, Political Action Committee (PAC)

It's becoming painfully evident that the consequences of global warming are coming sooner than scientists expected, and are more severe than expected. It's also become evident that we cannot just point our fingers at polluting industries or lax government regulation.

The head of the United Nation's Nobel Prize-winning scientific panel on climate change recently warned that lifestyle changes are needed to put the brakes on global warming. In addition to driving less and slowing our consumption of products, Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, a vegetarian, asks that we eat less meat.

"Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today's most serious environmental problems," according to senior U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization official Henning Steinfeld, and said that urgent action is needed to remedy the situation. Livestock rearing generates more global warming greenhouse gases, as measured in CO2 equivalent, than transportation, according to a recent U.N. report, "Livestock's Long Shadow — Environmental Issues and Options."

So what can we do about it? A lot. We can take action three times every day by choosing plant-based foods. To learn more and get started, go to www.earthsave.org. — Olina St. Onge, Medford