There is an effort under way to form the Rogue Valley Heritage District to operate and maintain heritage sites and structures, acquire and preserve historical objects and materials, and to maintain programs of heritage societies operating within the district.

There is an effort under way to form the Rogue Valley Heritage District to operate and maintain heritage sites and structures, acquire and preserve historical objects and materials, and to maintain programs of heritage societies operating within the district.

As a former member of the Historical Society's board of trustees, I am well aware of the importance of the 14 heritage societies included in the proposed Heritage District. In Medford, there is the Rogue Valley Genealogical Society, the National Railroad Historic Society and the Southern Oregon Historical Society's outstanding research library — frequented by reporters, authors, college students, historians and others.

For several years I have worked for the society as a volunteer oral historian and have conducted over 200 interviews, which are available in the research library. The oral histories referenced such subjects as the timber industry, aviation, Britt Music Festivals and the Rogue Basin projects. Recently, working with the Library of Congress, we have been interviewing World War II veterans.

Soon, Jackson County residents may be asked to sign a petition which is merely a request to Jackson County Commissioners to initiate proceedings to form the Rogue Valley Heritage District. Please help save this valuable resource. — Pat Clason, Medford

Obama's pastor has been rightly criticized for his remarks about our country. I must remind us that this kind of rhetoric is not new.

Do we remember similar remarks made by Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell after the 9/11 attacks? These white evangelical pastors also blamed our country's moral and secular behaviors for the attack on the Pentagon and the Twin Towers. How many of us stood up to denounce their remarks? — Ronald Steffani, Ashland

From the walks I take, within Medford itself, I see hundreds of motor homes (and maybe within Medford there are thousands). My idea of what to do with them is for the city to have its own trailer compound where everything is up to code, well-landscaped and everything, even A-plus units, to be rented. This could become everyone's contribution to those who have less.

But if you have what you think is a better idea, a great number of people would like to hear it, I believe. Maybe there could be a contest to take care of some of this litter of leftover dreams.

And there are other ways to sell new cars other than what exist now. Medford could be a pacesetter. — Dave G. Alexander, Medford

It is really scary being a member of the "vulnerable users of our roads." By vulnerable, I mean it is a 4,000-pound motor vehicle versus a 25-pound bike, and/or a pedestrian.

Recently, around the valley, incidents of failure to yield the right of way have occurred, accidents have resulted and vehicle operators have not been cited because they did not "see" the vulnerable user of the road.

Roads are built and maintained using public money. As result, they are for everyone to share, and each of us has rights and responsibilities with regard to that use. However, the institutionalization of "invisibility of the vulnerable" by law enforcement has robbed pedestrians and cyclists of many rights.

Because they are so large and fast, vehicles have special legal and moral responsibilities because they not only have to "see" the vulnerable parties, they have to "care" for them, unlike the small, elderly lady I saw crossing a street the other day under a barrage of car horns for taking too long. It is time we share the road with care and kindness, and for law enforcement to do its job. — Ron Zell, Ashland