With the addition of the two state heritage trees in the Central Point area, there are now nearly 50 heritage tree sites in Oregon.

With the addition of the two state heritage trees in the Central Point area, there are now nearly 50 heritage tree sites in Oregon.

Although the preponderance of the trees are in the northwest part of the state, there are now more than half a dozen in Southwest Oregon.

Not including the recent additions, heritage trees in the region include:

The sequoia redwood tree planted in Jacksonville by pioneer photographer and horticulturist Peter Britt on his son Emil's birthday, March 22, 1862. The giant sequoia, now more than 200 feet tall, can be seen in the Britt Gardens. One mile south of Shady Cove near milepost 18 stands what is known as the "Lonesome Hickory." It was planted in 1866 by pioneer Mary Louisa Black from a nut she had carried west the year before on the Oregon Trail from Missouri. The Judge Waldo Tree is a mountain hemlock just stone's throw from Island Lake, the largest lake in the Sky Lakes Wilderness of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. It was probably a mature tree when the camping party led by Judge John Breckenridge Waldo stopped by on Sept. 13, 1888. The pioneering campers blazed their initials on the mountain hemlock that is now nearly three feet in diameter at chest height. The Mitchell Monument Shrapnel Tree is a ponderosa pine about 15 miles north of Bly in the Fremont National Forest. It was there that a Japanese balloon bomb exploded, killing six picnickers, including a former Medford resident, on May 5, 1945. They were the only American war casualties in the contiguous 48 states during World War II. Four miles south of Brookings at the Chetco Valley Museum stands a Monterey cypress planted by pioneer Harrison Blake when he built his house in the 1850s. At more than 97 feet high with a trunk girth of 27 feet, it is the largest Monterey cypress in the state. Nineteen miles east of Brookings in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is a redwood tree known as the Bombsite Tree. It was planted as a token of peace in 1992 at the site of the only Japanese aerial bombing by airplane in the lower 48 states during World War II.