Gov. Ted Kulongoski needs to put his political ambitions aside and listen to the people when they vote in our primary.

Gov. Ted Kulongoski needs to put his political ambitions aside and listen to the people when they vote in our primary.

If Senator Obama wins the popular vote and Kulongoski still backs Senator Clinton then he is making a mockery of the system. He (Kulongoski) stated if Obama wins the popular vote he would only endorse him if Clinton gives him permission. Is he a man or Hillary's lapdog? — Michael Kreiser, Eagle Point

Factual accuracy is vital in this season of presidential politics. So I question a statement in your March 23 story on Obama's visit to Medford: "Obama voted against going into Iraq in 2003 while Sens. Clinton and McCain supported it."

The crucial vote by Congress occurred well before Obama was elected to the U.S. Senate. I was then a local school board member in Ohio while Obama was an Illinois state legislator; thus our views and votes didn't count. Nor could we study the intelligence — now known to be faulty — on which Congress relied in making tough decisions. Even Colin Powell was misled into supporting the Bush-Cheney-Rumsfield policy. As I recall, the crucial vote was about giving the commander-in-chief authority to use force against our enemies following the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.

As voters consider two qualified Democratic presidential candidates, they must be aware of the reality of that fateful period. It's easier to oppose a policy from afar than to stand up and be counted when asked to protect the nation. We should ask how we, knowing just what Sens. Clinton and McCain knew then as they sought to keep America safe, would have voted. — Betty R. Kazmin, Medford

If Hillary Clinton had read chapter four of Barack Obama's "Dreams From My Father," in which he agonizes over his blood line and tries to make sense of the division between races, perhaps she wouldn't have been so quick to say that she would have dropped her own pastor in the same circumstances in which Sen. Obama found himself when the Rev. Wright said those inflammatory words. — Doris Hirigoyen, Phoenix

The race issue in America in a large part continues to exist for the profit of individuals and organizations. These people, such as Al Sharpton and organizations such as the NAACP, exist on monies generated by keeping the race issue out in front. They thrive on the fact that as long as they make it seem a problem that Americans will do as they do with any problem and that is to throw money at it and hope it will go away.

The most recent case would be the Duke lacrosse team when they were falsely accused of sexual misconduct to a black woman. Almost immediately Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the NAACP were there making it a race issue. When it came out that the charges were false, did any of these people or organizations step up and apologize for their part in condemning these individuals? No, they did not, because there is no profit in admitting the true reason they chose to get involved.

I am not saying there is not still a racial problem in America, because there is. I am saying that these people blow it out of proportion for their own profit. — T. Moore, Central Point

I would like someone to explain to me the difference between "misspoke" and lie, a new term in Hillary's lexicon.

What sniper fire? What prominent role in promoting the peace in Ireland? Who is this deceitful women who will do and say anything to promote her own agenda? Haven't we had enough of the Clinton's, their machinations and narcissistic disconnect from reality? — Yale Sacks, Central Point

Thankfully Gen. Merrill McPeak is retired. Having someone delusional enough to equate Bill Clinton to Joseph McCarthy in command of American troops at war would be positively terrifying. — Robert Bennett, Grants Pass

I witnessed hope in Medford on Saturday and shook his hand. Barack Obama.

I have voted in every election since I became of age. In 1960, I wasn't old enough to vote for JFK. For the first time in my life; in May, I will be voting for a candidate who inspires me with hope.

We've been sold nothing but fear for many years. I'm not buying it anymore. Not when hope is finally available. — Shelly Simmons, Ashland

When George W. and his entourage last descended on Southern Oregon it was pathetic! They left our little hamlet as they are leaving our country, with war (Jacksonville riot/police/bullying), pain (our citizens abused/injured), public outcry and economic strife (lawsuits, security costs). They didn't even pay their bills promptly to our local purveyors.

John McCain is from the same mold: war, big money, greed and personal agenda.

Wow, what a difference when Barack Obama visited. There was laughing, hope, genuine conversation, even peaceful disagreement and protest. He strolled through our area's poorest part, among us, crossing security lines. He talked and walked with us, shook our hands and truly touched us.

There will be costs to us for security. I suggest these have and will be returned tenfold through his actions and our hope.

I am also willing to bet he pays his bills. — Michael Slavenski, Medford

This letter is in response to Mary Ann Johnson's letter of March 21. She was defending Barack Obama's lack of experience to be president by saying, "his lack of experience in deceit, lying, arrogance, etc., should qualify him to be president."

It's amazing to me how people see only what they want to see. When all the hoopla about Jeremiah Wright came out, Obama's first response was, "I never heard any of that rhetoric when I was in the pew." When he realized this problem was not going away quickly, he changed his story to, "Well, yes, I did hear some of that, but ..." So if Obama's initial denial wasn't lying and deceit, what was it? — Neil Whiteford, Central Point

I watched Mr. Obama on television here and he certainly seems to be a fine young man. However, I could never vote for him because he has one grave fault. He claimed that if he were elected he would reach out to every child. This does not, however, include unborn children.

I look at the babies and toddlers in church and in the shopping malls. I then thank our dear Lord that their parents permitted them to be born.

These future citizens of our country are the hope of America. Please think about this before voting. — Mary Lawrence, Medford

What will it take for pro-choice supporters of Sen. Barack Obama to examine their consciences?

Sen. Obama supports abortion — killing a baby.

Sen. Obama supports late-term abortion — killing a baby likely old enough to survive outside the womb.

Sen. Obama supports partial-birth abortion — killing a baby during the process of birth while it is actually in the birth canal.

Sen. Obama opposes mandatory medical care for babies who actually survive a botched abortion — babies injured by the abortion attempt but somehow born alive.

Isn't it ironic that Sen. Obama's town hall meeting in Medford was at "Kids Unlimited"? Better that he should speak at "Kids Very Limited"! — Kathy Watson, Medford

Being humbled by the awesome generosity shown by those wonderful people of Southern Oregon, who offered to give up their ticket to the Obama town hall meeting so that this veteran might attend, thank you so much!

To the following individuals on behalf of my fabulous wife Celia, her wonderful granddaughter, Brandi Adams, and myself, we extend our sincerest thank you and may the near future deliver as much happiness, joy and excitement to you as you made in our lives.

Sen. Alan Bates, Denise Cyr, Philip James Pathern, Courtney, Kathy Newman, Damian Mann, Bob Pennell. — P.J. Bowles, Medford

While in Medford, Barack Obama said he will tax oil company "windfall" profits, and at the same time get the companies to build more refining capacity. Ignoring the fact that no new refineries have been built in the U.S. for 30 years, largely for environmental reasons, I wonder where he thinks the money is going to come from if he takes profits away.

Who decides what "windfall" profits are? Oil company profit margins are less than many other industries (check pharmaceuticals).

Sounds like yet another piece of pie-in-the-sky rhetoric from a candidate who should know better. — David R. Newell, Eagle Point