COASTWIDE - The black and blue rockfish have moved off the bite this past week, with catches poor in shallow waters. The near-shore reefs and rocks are so loaded with shrimp right now the rockfish are feeding plenty well and appear not to be too aggressive toward fake bait.

COASTWIDE - The black and blue rockfish have moved off the bite this past week, with catches poor in shallow waters. The near-shore reefs and rocks are so loaded with shrimp right now the rockfish are feeding plenty well and appear not to be too aggressive toward fake bait.

The marine aggregate limit is five fish a day and rockfish anglers must remain within the 20-fathom curve. Lingcod anglers must also remain within the 20-fathom curve, but anglers targeting flatfish, tuna and salmon are unaffected by the bag-limit change.

The fin-clipped coho salmon fishery from Cape Falcon to the California border is closed for the season.

BROOKINGS - Choppy seas and windy conditions are forecast until this weekend, when seas should calm enough for some decent fishing conditions. With salmon season over and the rockfish bite a bit slow, anglers can try for tuna about 30 miles off- shore.

NEWPORT - Tuna seem to be scattered and schools are all more than 25 miles offshore. The average catch per angler was down from earlier in the month to between two and four fish. Halibut fishing during the all-depth weekends remains very good when weather cooperates. Almost four halibut have been caught for every five anglers this past week, a good percentage for putting up with the time and cost of a trip. The all-depth openings for Pacific halibut are now every Friday, Saturday and Sunday on the central coast from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain until Oct. 26 or when the quota is reached.

GOLD BEACH - Trolling for fall chinook during in-coming and high-slack tides has been fair to good, with around 50 fish caught daily. Plenty of big salmon are in the estuary, but there also is plenty of feed keeping them busy.

CLATSOP - Recreational mussel harvesting from Arcadia Beach in Clatsop County to the mouth of the Columbia River is closed due to elevated levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning, also called PSP toxins. The closure includes mussels on the beaches, rocks, jetties and at the entrance to bays in this section of the Oregon Coast. Coastal scallops are not affected by this closure when only the adductor muscle is eaten. If you don't know what adductors are, don't eat scallops you find.

COOS BAY - Tuna fishing had been good before this week's north winds and choppy surf discouraged anglers from heading far off shore. Crabbers are averaging 5-6 crabs per day.