Barack Obama got ribbed by John McCain when he advised drivers to fill their tires with the appropriate air pressure, but the Car Care Council, a nonprofit funded by an auto trade group, agrees with the Democrat.

Barack Obama got ribbed by John McCain when he advised drivers to fill their tires with the appropriate air pressure, but the Car Care Council, a nonprofit funded by an auto trade group, agrees with the Democrat.

Car maintenance, the group says, can do a lot for your fuel economy. Car Care recommends the following steps from fueleconomy.gov, the Web site of the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, to save money:

Once a month, check that your tires are properly inflated. Gas savings: up to 12 cents a gallon. Boost in fuel economy: up to 3 percent. Replace dirty air filters. Check them every 3,000 miles. Gas savings: up to 40 cents a gallon. Boost in fuel economy: up to 10 percent. Use the right grade of motor oil, and change it regularly. Gas savings: less than a penny a gallon. Boost in fuel economy: 1 to 2 percent. Tune up your engine, about once every 30,000 to 100,000 miles, depending on the car. Gas savings: 16 cents a gallon. Boost in fuel economy: 4 percent. Taking care of a serious problem, like a bad oxygen sensor, can greatly improve your gas mileage, sometimes by as much as 40 percent.

The savings are based on $3.96 a gallon gas.

The Car Care Council also recommends keeping your gas cap on tight and replacing spark plugs during tuneups.